radiogenic lead

radiogenic lead

[¦rād·ē·ō¦jen·ik ′led]
(nuclear physics)
Stable, end-product lead (Pb-206, Pb-207, and Pb-208) occurring in rocks and minerals that is the result of in-place decay of uranium and thorium since the formation of the earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, [mu] values of <9.58 are consistent with low quantities of radiogenic lead, and the mean isotopic composition of mantle-derived lead is 8-9 [36].
In addition, the fact that granites contain elevated concentrations of U and Th means that they are also enriched in radiogenic lead, especially when compared with radiogenic lead-depleted basalt and island arc volcanic rocks.
Samples with older ages (higher radiogenic lead and lower radioactive uranium, leading to higher Pb/U ratios) plot further to the top and right on the curve, and younger samples plot toward the bottom left.
Its strong radiogenic lead enrichment suggests a source that is enriched in U relative to Pb (Chauvel et al.
Tantalo-niobates such as tantalite and columbite are ideally suited for U-Pb dating because of the potential to incorporate U (200-1000 ppm; Romer & Wright 1992; Kinny 2000) and, therefore, contain a significant radiogenic lead content.
More radiogenic leads in walrus occurred in Thule and Repulse Bay, areas characterized by Proterozoic or Archean crust reworked in the Proterozoic.
where m is the slope of the secondary isochron, [lambda]5 and [lambda]8 are the decay constants of 235U and 238U, respectively, [t.sub.1] and [t.sub.2] are the production ages of the radiogenic leads, and a calculated slope of 0.0773628 from the data of Ayuso et al.