radiosonde


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to radiosonde: rawinsonde

radiosonde

(rā`dēōsŏnd), group of instruments for simultaneous measurement and radio transmission of meteorological data, including temperature, pressure, and humidity of the atmosphere. The instrument package is usually carried into the atmosphere by a balloon (see weather balloonweather balloon,
balloon used in the measurement and evaluation of mostly upper atmospheric conditions (see atmosphere). Information may be gathered during the vertical ascent of the balloon through the atmosphere or during its motions once it has reached a predetermined maximum
..... Click the link for more information.
); balloon-borne radiosondes reach altitudes as great as 90,000 ft (27,400 m) above the earth's surface. A radiosonde may also be carried by a rocket, in which case it is known as a rocketsonde, or dropped by parachute (usually from an aircraft), in which case it is known as a dropsonde. Instruments included in a radiosonde are typically transducers for humidity, temperature, and pressure measurements; controls to improve return signals and determine which measurements are to be transmitted to data stations; and a radio transmitter. Radar also has been used to measure and transmit meteorological data from a radiosonde. These radiosonde observations are made as often as four times daily at some meteorological stations around the globe.

Radiosonde

 

an aerological instrument that measures the pressure, temperature, and humidity of the air; the values of these meteorological components are then automatically transmitted to earth by radio from various altitudes during the ascent through the atmosphere.

A radiosonde consists of sensing elements, transducers that convert the small changes of the sensing elements into electric values, coding apparatus, and a lightweight shortwave radio transmitter. The radiosonde is lifted by a pilot balloon to an altitude of 30 to 40 km. During the ascent, the radiosonde automatically sends coded signals corresponding to the instrument readings, and the signals are picked up by a radio receiver at the launching site. The operating range is approximately 150 to 200 km. There are balloon-borne radiosondes that can also measure wind velocity and direction.

Radiosondes are used extensively for vertical atmospheric sounding. The first radiosonde was constructed by the Soviet scientist P. A. Molchanov in 1930.

radiosonde

[′rād·ē·ō‚sänd]
(engineering)
A balloon-borne instrument for the simultaneous measurement and transmission of meteorological data; the instrument consists of transducers for the measurement of pressure, temperature, and humidity, a modulator for the conversion of the output of the transducers to a quantity which controls a property of the radio-frequency signal, a selector switch which determines the sequence in which the parameters are to be transmitted, and a transmitter which generates the radio-frequency carrier.

radiosonde

A radio transmitter used in conjunction with a balloon. It transmits data on temperature, pressure, and humidity. A radiosonde balloon can attain a height of approximately 65,000 ft (20 km) with small balloons and 115,000 ft (34 km) with large balloons. This balloon is tracked by radar to calculate upper winds. See radarsonde.

radiosonde

an airborne instrument to send meteorological information back to earth by radio
References in periodicals archive ?
Upper air data was also recorded from this site from the daily release of radiosondes (weather balloons) which take wind speed and direction measurements (along with other weather parameters).
Phoenix, AZ, Jan 13, 2009 - (ACN Newswire) - Vaisala is investing in the development of an operational reference radiosonde.
Meteorological measuring sets, AN/TMQ-41, NSN 6660-01-386-3906, and AN/ TMQ-41A, NSN 6660-01-468-3306, that have not had their processors upgraded use radiosonde set, RS80-67, NSN 6660-01-353-8793.
A radiosonde station was established in Peoria as part of a national network of radiosondes.
The best available meteorological records show that there has been no significant net global warming since 1958 (the start of the weather balloon radiosonde record), nor since 1979 (the start of the satellite microwave sensing record) apart from a small step of about 0.
The radio signals have lost contact with the radiosonde.
When a balloon bursts at high altitude, as designed, the radiosonde is released to return to earth, slowed by a small parachute.
This linear connection was first determined by Okulov (2003) on the basis of radiosonde observations at Tallinn Aerological Station (59.
One of the most comprehensive online sources for radiosonde data is maintained by FSL at http://raob.
Balloon-borne radiosonde and satellite measurements of the temperature of the "free atmosphere" (i.
Using radiosonde transmitters and radar tracking, balloon observers obtained air temperature, humidity, pressure, and wind direction and speed to elevations of 50,000 feet.