rag

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rag

1
1. 
a. a small piece of cloth, such as one torn from a discarded garment, or such pieces of cloth collectively
b. (as modifier): a rag doll
2. Brit slang, esp naval a flag or ensign

rag

2
in British universities
a. a period, usually a week, in which various events are organized to raise money for charity, including a procession of decorated floats and tableaux
b. (as modifier): rag day

rag

Jazz
a piece of ragtime music

rag

[rag]
(petrology)
Any of various hard, coarse, rubbly, or shell rocks that weather with a rough, irregular surface, such as a flaggy sandstone or limestone used as a building stone. Also known as ragstone.

rag

A large roofing slate that has one edge untrimmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
"King Lear," an upsetting allegro assai, is the opus's raggedly beautiful gem.
This time, purple stained my swollen left eye and jaw; the crowns on my two front teeth, put in place after an earlier fall, chipped; my lips puffed out in a parody of a sexual pout; and inside the lower lip, four sutures held together the raggedly bitten flesh.
The quasi-Balanchine dance routines, now credited to Nikki Woollaston, were raggedly executed."
The raggedly sketchy color illustrations suit this whimsical story just right.
At home time there was always a congestion of mothers, toddler siblings, sturdy push-chairs and coach-built prams gathered at the school entrance and we journeyed home in families and groups of families, raggedly rather than briskly, playing and dawdling as we went.
Cole Young resumed his customary posture, supine on the plywood litter, his raggedly absent leg spewing a long dark arc.
Because "the shreds of fog here and there raggedly furring her" (38) obscure Delano's vision as he approaches the San Dominick to offer assistance, his mind tricks him into seeing illusions: the ship at one point appears to him as "a whitewashed monastery after a thunderstorm, seen perched upon some dun cliff among the Pyrenees" (38).
As the youngest, Kristoffer Sakurai, making his debut, started raggedly but soon hit his stride, performing the controlled jumps and rapid batterie with modest insouciance, his acting textured with youthful impulse.
He was sitting at the end, raggedly clothed, wearing boots that gave evidence of a past sturdiness but now had a web-like fragility.
The salient features of this writing are (1) a forceful but plain lexicon (a single word can become an echo chamber); (2) the use of spare, unadorned lines, often raggedly enjambed; and (3) frequent disjunctive shifts in levels of diction, creating a tonal democracy that ranges from fierce to tender.
(43) Officials ended by throwing raggedly clothes at prisoners with "no consideration as to [their] size, durability, or particularities...." (44)
Even the form she uses, with the right edge of the poem justified and the left surging back and forth raggedly, gives an impression of more freedom, and of a more organic quality, than the usual left-justified verse.