rag

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rag

1
1. 
a. a small piece of cloth, such as one torn from a discarded garment, or such pieces of cloth collectively
b. (as modifier): a rag doll
2. Brit slang, esp naval a flag or ensign

rag

2
in British universities
a. a period, usually a week, in which various events are organized to raise money for charity, including a procession of decorated floats and tableaux
b. (as modifier): rag day

rag

Jazz
a piece of ragtime music

rag

[rag]
(petrology)
Any of various hard, coarse, rubbly, or shell rocks that weather with a rough, irregular surface, such as a flaggy sandstone or limestone used as a building stone. Also known as ragstone.

rag

A large roofing slate that has one edge untrimmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
And on the edges of the frenetically flowing center, the slow human stream of daily life--eating, bathing, trading; children walking in neat school uniforms among the raggedness of barefoot others.
Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bid the pelting of this pitiless night, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these?
In some ways the raggedness of the presentation made one more sympathetic to the unevenness of the work on view.
The visitors won with a typically classy Ryan Giggs goal in the 75th minute and for all the raggedness of the opposition the victory will instil confidence in Toshack's men.
At times Koven overplays his hand, as when he tells us that raggedness, specifically "ripped and torn clothing" was not only an effective visual marker of poverty but could also be a disturbingly erotic sign and offers as corroborating evidence C.L.
As I walk around my path, winding my way around my own inner garden, I notice I have some well-tended areas, and yet there is great beauty in the raggedness of the areas not tended; the ones that were left to find their way without guidance and support.
measures both the non-repeatable Repeated runs edge raggedness components with the same of the tape and visible.
Foster's detailed research, his recreation of the mess and raggedness of the everyday, helps us to understand the motivations behind the various manoeuvres and strategies of Yeats and his circle.
If there is raggedness or shredding on the inside surface, you'll probably also find chipping or burrs on the shaft sleeve.
This means ideally that dense areas of print, such as blocks and large lettering, would be filled completely and show no mottle, while lines and dots would offer sharp definition, measured in terms of circularity and raggedness, respectively.
As populations at mutation-drift equilibrium are expected to have ragged mismatch distributions (Rogers & Harpending 1992), the r measure of 'raggedness' (Harpending 1994) was calculated using ARLEQUIN; tests of r = 0 were carried out by parametric bootstrapping (10,000 replicates), also using ARLEQUIN.