RAID

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RAID

[rād]
(computer science)
A group of hard disks that operate together to improve performance or provide fault tolerance and error recovery through data striping, mirroring, and other techniques. Derived from redundant array of inexpensive disks.

Raid

 

a penetration into the enemy rear by mobile tank, mechanized, cavalry, and partisan units for the purpose of inflicting losses; destroying important installations, such as bridges, airfields, railroads, communication lines, warehouses, and supply bases; disrupting the work of supply and evacuation routes; supporting or organizing partisan movements; and diverting enemy forces.

Raids have been used in many wars. The raids by Russian cavalry detachments, such as D. V. Davydov and M. I. Platov’s cossacks in the rear of the French Army in the Patriotic War of 1812, and the large-scale cavalry raids of the Civil War of 1918–20 are well known. During the Great Patriotic War (1941–45) raids were made by Soviet cavalry units, for example, the raid by General P. A. Belov’s cavalry corps in 1942, and by many partisan units.

RAID

RAID

(Redundant Array of Independent Disks) A disk or solid state drive (SSD) subsystem that increases performance or provides fault tolerance or both. RAID uses two or more physical drives and a RAID controller, which is plugged into motherboards that do not have RAID circuits. Today, most motherboards have built-in RAID but not necessarily every RAID configuration (see below). In the past, RAID was also accomplished by software only but was much slower. In the late 1980s, the "I" in RAID stood for "inexpensive" but was later changed to "independent."

In large storage area networks (SANs), floor-standing RAID units are common with terabytes of storage and huge amounts of cache memory. RAID is also used in desktop computers by gamers for speed and by business users for reliability. Following are the various RAID configurations. See NAS and SAN.


Big RAID
EMC has been a leader in high-end RAID systems for years with systems storing multiple terabytes of data. (Image courtesy of EMC Corporation.)


RAID 0 - Striping for Performance (Popular)
Widely used for gaming, striping interleaves data across multiple drives for performance. However, there are no safeguards against failure. See RAID 0.



Big RAID
EMC has been a leader in high-end RAID systems for years with systems storing multiple terabytes of data. (Image courtesy of EMC Corporation.)


RAID 1 - Mirroring for Fault Tolerance (Popular)
Widely used, RAID 1 writes two drives at the same time. It provides the highest reliability but doubles the number of drives needed.

RAID 10 combines RAID 1 mirroring with RAID 0 striping for both safety and performance. See RAID 1 and RAID 10.



Big RAID
EMC has been a leader in high-end RAID systems for years with systems storing multiple terabytes of data. (Image courtesy of EMC Corporation.)


RAID 3 - Speed and Fault Tolerance
Data are striped across three or more drives for performance, and parity is computed for safety. Similar to RAID 3, RAID 4 uses block level striping but is not as popular. See RAID 3 and RAID parity.



Big RAID
EMC has been a leader in high-end RAID systems for years with systems storing multiple terabytes of data. (Image courtesy of EMC Corporation.)


RAID 5 - Speed and Fault Tolerance (Popular)
Data are striped across three or more drives for performance, and parity is computed for safety. RAID 5 is similar to RAID 3, except that the parity is distributed to all drives. RAID 6 offers more reliability than RAID 5 by performing more parity computations. For more details, see RAID 5.



Big RAID
EMC has been a leader in high-end RAID systems for years with systems storing multiple terabytes of data. (Image courtesy of EMC Corporation.)




Big RAID
EMC has been a leader in high-end RAID systems for years with systems storing multiple terabytes of data. (Image courtesy of EMC Corporation.)







Little RAID
Arco was first to provide RAID 1 on IDE disk drives rather than SCSI. This two-drive unit connected to the motherboard with one cable like a single drive. (Image courtesy of Arco Computer Products, Inc., www.arcoide.com)







Early RAID
This RAID prototype was built by University of Berkeley graduate students in 1992. Housing 36 320MB disk drives, total storage was 11GB. (Image courtesy of The Computer History Museum, www.computerhistory.org)







USB RAID
Super Talent's USB 3.0 RAID drives provide RAID 0 storage that is faster than an internal hard drive. (Image courtesy of Super Talent Technology Corporation, www.supertalent.com)
References in periodicals archive ?
British war poet and officer Edmund Blunden's famous quote also surely applies to many members of the Canadian Corps: "The word 'raid' may be defined as the one in the whole vocabulary of the war which most instantly caused a sinking feeling in the stomach of ordinary mortals." Elsewhere he writes, "Our greatest distress at this period was due to that short dry word 'raid'." Clearly, throughout the BEF (including the Canadian Corps), many experienced hands joined raids, but others detested it and avoided raiding if possible.
Absolute control was unachievable, but domination was, and raiding was a key element in the Corps' establishment of its dominance and the benefits that accrued.
Early in the war, raiding was initiated at brigade and even as low as battalion level, to address local circumstances.
Haig was a proponent of 'ceaseless attrition'--aggressing the enemy even during periods of relative quiet between major attacks--and saw raiding as a key element of this strategy.
Potentially raiding could suppress German patrols, intimidate wiring parties, eliminate outposts and restrict German activities in no-man's-land, effectively blinding the enemy.
In sum, it would seem that the intelligence value of raiding was strictly limited but raids' potential to cause casualties, mayhem and destruction was considerable.
On the other side of the ledger are the material and human costs of raiding. A raid, as a small attack, required support from engineers and artillery and the corresponding use of supplies and ordinance, with the exception of sand bags, wire and other equipment required defending a captured position.
Geoffrey Jackson, analyzing the raiding program of the 4th Division in the summer of 1917, concludes it had no significant impact on the division and its performance.
Eventually, this later benefit grew significantly in raiding practice.
raiding parties, and their casualties, were disproportionately comprised of veterans, the decorated and the most aggressive.
There are deep, deep roots for ranging or raiding. According to Col.
He said there was one lady constable who had been part of the raiding party, but six more women handled the arrested women after all those arrested were brought to the police station.