Railing


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railing

[′rāl·iŋ]
(civil engineering)
A barrier consisting of a rail and supports.
(electronics)
Radar pulse jamming at high recurrence rates (50 to 150 kilohertz); it results in an image on a radar indicator resembling fence railing.

Railing

Any open construction or rail used as a barrier, composed of one or a series of horizontal rails supported by spaced upright balusters.

railing

1. Rails, collectively, or a combination of rails.
2. Any openwork construction or rail used as a barrier or the like.
References in classic literature ?
Upon the iron railing that protected the station lawn sat other men.
He procured a pipe from a neighbouring public-house, and smoked it, looking in at the railings and maturely considering the spot.
He said, "that being then not very well with the court, and pressed by many of his friends, he complied with the proposal; and after employing a hundred men for two years, the work miscarried, the projectors went off, laying the blame entirely upon him, railing at him ever since, and putting others upon the same experiment, with equal assurance of success, as well as equal disappointment.
At this instant the colonel and Monsieur d'Albon could distinctly see her features; she, herself, perceiving the two friends, sprang to the iron railing with the lightness and rapidity of a deer.
The square, when they got there, was full of wind and dust, and the thin trees in the garden were lashing themselves along the railing.
They wanted a light railing put up, and help to keep the people back.
The overture to the second act began; and, at the first sound of the leader's bow across his violin, Franz observed the sleeper slowly arise and approach the Greek girl, who turned around to say a few words to him, and then, leaning forward again on the railing of her box, she became as absorbed as before in what was going on.
A derrick pulled them up in the air, and dumped them into a boat, where passengers were bustling about among barrels of cider, baskets of cheese and bags of meal; chickens cackled, the captain swore and a cabin-boy rested on the railing, apparently indifferent to his surroundings.
Some officers of the scattered infantry were cursing and railing like fishwives.