raked joint

raked joint

[′rākt ′jȯint]
(civil engineering)
A mortar, or masonry, joint from which the mortar has been scraped out to about ¾ inch (20 millimeters).

raked joint

A joint made by removing the surface of mortar with a square-edged tool while it is still soft; produces marked shadows and tends to darken the overall appearance of a wall; not a weather-tight joint. See also: Mortar joint

raked joint

raked joint
A joint made by removing the surface of mortar, while it is still soft, with a square-edged tool; is difficult to make watertight; produces marked shadows and tends to darken the overall appearance of a wall.
References in periodicals archive ?
The handrail comprises a rope secured with steel wire rings to a horizontal tube welded to the vertical bars, while the abutments are made from local stone slabs, layered vertically to create ramped access; deep raked joints recreate the rhythm of the deck and railings.
The stones will probably weather until they are the same colour as the medieval ones, but there is no attempt to make the new work look like old; pointing is in proper mortar with raked joints, yet the stones do not emulate the original shape or bond.