random experiments

random experiments

[′ran·dəm ik′sper·ə·məns]
(statistics)
Experiments which do not always yield the same result when repeated under the same conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the definition of 'random experiment', correctly implemented surveys and scientific experiments can be viewed as random experiments.
There is a way to make natural experiments satisfy the condition for random experiments. That is, if all variables involved are included in the model, natural experiments can be viewed as being under approximately the same condition and thus can be treated as equivalent to a random experiment or a controlled experiment.
When one thinks of Chemistry class, the first thing that comes to mind is probably a group of students huddling around equipment, performing random experiments with chemicals from the laboratory.
In the model, uncertainty is modelled as localized Bernoulli random experiments, additively affecting either labor demand or labor productivity.
* Random (also a number of random experiments is given)
Also for 1,000 random experiments, the results were much better than when using deterministic criteria.
of Montreal) offer researchers and graduate and advanced graduate students a compendium of Monte Carlo methods, which are statistical methods that involve random experiments on a computer.
Students can draw different conclusions by carrying out a small number of random experiments. Based on these differences, students should realise that a large number of random experiments is necessary to discover general relationships.
Alison Saunders, head of the CPS Organised Crime Division, said: "These were not random experiments in computer hacking, but a deliberate effort to breach US defence systems at a critical time which caused well documented damage.
Much of what I am talking about was the result of the LEAA program under President Nixon, which also resulted in the seminal publications on criminal justice, true random experiments, and a level of energy and enthusiasm about the "calling of our profession." Those involved in policing had been influenced by the Camelot years of President John F.
In this fortunate case, results can be delivered much sooner after the research was initially commissioned than random experiments.
(If the Scream franchise is any indication, the general public is more sophisticated about the genre than lofty filmmakers who view it from atop an ivory abattoir.) Instead, the camera's disengagement from the family's ordeal turns them into frightened lab animals subject to grotesque random experiments (let's measure the exact amount of despair on a woman's face when she's forced to strip at gunpoint, or test the parents' emotional capacity to absorb the shock of seeing their son's head blown off right before their eyes).