range of motion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

range of motion

[′rānj əv ′mō·shən]
(biophysics)
The degree of movement that can occur in a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not uncommon for anyone who has had surgery to develop scar tissue as well as swelling and bruising of the soft tissues resulting in pain and decreased range of motion.
Effect of muscles energy technique on cervical ROM is supported by the study of Ronald Schenk and his colleagues on patients who had limitation in cervical range of motion and conclude it as an effective treatment to increase Cervical ROM.12 This study will help people to gain cervical ROM and pain relief by giving MET.
After frozen shoulder, will my full range of motion be restored?
After three to six months, most dancers return almost to their preoperative range of motion, says Padgett.
Measures of active lumber spine range of motion can be obtained with a number of methods including visual observation, tape measure/ruler, goniometry, linear measures, and inclinometry.
The basic problem is that "progress" tends to mean getting deeper into a pose--increasing "flexibility" by creating an increasingly dubious, if not actually dangerous, range of motion. When instructed to breathe and sink deeper into a pose, the first question to ask your instructor is "Why?" Is there a functional good beyond achieving the pose itself?
In professional ice hockey players, there is no difference in shoulder range of motion and strength between the right and left upper extremity.
Studies (7, 11) have shown the influence of traditional strength training intensity on range of motion (i.e., flexibility).
The main goals of stretching are to increase range of motion, improve performance, and reduce injuries (McHugh & Cosgrave, 2010; Weerapong, Hume & Kolt, 2004).
This can lead to reduced ventilation, impaired coughing function, secretion stagnation, and even more limited thoracic range of motion, which in turn can lead to serious respiratory complications.
Pitchers with a deficit of more than five degrees in total range of motion (TRM) in their dominant shoulder had a 2.3 times higher risk of injury, while pitchers with a deficit of five or more degrees in shoulder flexion of the dominant shoulder had a 2.8 times higher risk of injury.