rapacious

(redirected from rapaciously)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

rapacious

(of animals, esp birds) subsisting by catching living prey
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Much as she may seem deadened, Malkina responds more completely, even rapaciously to experience, without the burden of expectations about how she ought to act.
William Kenrick pounced rapaciously on Johnson's edition first in the October and November issues of the Monthly Review (1765) and then in the same year at much greater length in his Review of Doctor Johnsons New Edition of Shakespeare (133 pages), charging him with plagiarism as well as deliberate neglect of Edwards's Canons in the notes.
(2) What these approaches fail to elaborate is the network of relations that enabled the production of these images in the first place as well as the politico-cultural context, which made them so rapaciously consumable as visual and exotic objects, not to mention meaningful.
Without a doubt, the interpretation of Santiago as a symbol of "code hero" is universally accepted, yet Nie introduces the Jungle Law to his analysis of the old man and gains from his failure the insight that human beings should prevent themselves from ethical chaos to "avoid degenerating themselves into animal and shoulder the ethical responsibility to maintain a harmonious relation with nature other than grab rapaciously from it according to Jungle Law"(214).
He and Chopra, assisted by some poor fielding, paced the pursuit nicely and, after they fell, Evans rounded it off rapaciously, abetted by Ateeq Javed's astute and faultless innings of 0 not out from 0 balls (no fours, no sixes).
The global economic network, or network of networks, rapaciously seeks to connect and integrate all that must be aligned and coordinated according to its logic of capital accumulation.
Indeed, so rapaciously and recklessly were the rulers out to make fortunes illicitly with both hands as if a new day was never to dawn and they had not to go again to the electorate to seek a fresh mandate.
The decline of Fordist production gives rise to a new capitalist subjectivity that Peters summarizes in the figure of the "empiricist in chief," who rapaciously exploits the new untamable nature of the post-Fordist anomie (477).
He argues that among the "gentlemanly capitalists" who moved between Whitehall and Thread-needle Street, those who ran India's financial operations in London were perhaps more gentlemanly than they were rapaciously capitalistic.
Take whoever loves you," who scared her off--the teenager later asks her crush about her own appetites: "When was the first time you tasted a girl?" Shortly after this besotting fact-finding mission--one of the film's best scenes--and with Emma's previously mentioned girlfriend mysteriously eliminated from the plot, the two rapaciously devour each other, kissing, licking, sucking, fingering, scissoring, ass-slapping, sixty-nining, and moaning.
[...] At their worst, hands grasp rapaciously to possess and hoard; at their best they demonstrate affection," just as, "[w]hen motivated by pity, the eye can provide insight and prophetic vision" opposed to Sauron's "brooding, self-centered circle" (9).
Liz Taylor is only on the fringes of the action, but a young aspiring actress, Dee Moray, is at the center of the story, along with the young Italian innkeeper, a World War II veteran struggling to become a writer, an up-and-coming producer who rises rapaciously to the heights of the film industry and scores of other flawed individuals.