rapid eye movement

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rapid eye movement

movement of the eyeballs under closed eyelids during paradoxical sleep, which occurs while the sleeper is dreaming
References in periodicals archive ?
These rapid eye movements the research investigates are not the well-known kind that are within the human sleep cycle, but rather are the movements our eyes make as we shift focus to another location in our field of vision.
The rapid eye movements we make when we shift our attention from one object to another, known as saccades, are essential to navigating, understanding, and interacting with the world around us.
In a study of 19 patients with epilepsy at the University of California, Los Angeles , rapid eye movements correlated with spikes in the activity of the part of the brain associated with vision and memories, similar to that shown by someone after they view images of famous people or places.
It is characterized by bursts of rapid eye movements and middle ear movements, along with twitches in the muscles of the face and that of the extremities.
AFLOATERS are quite a common occurrence in people of all ages and are particularly noticeable after rapid eye movements when looking towards a bright light.
For recording very rapid eye movements such as saccades, the computer should be set to a sampling rate of 100Hz.
"The majority of a night's sleep is spent in non-REM ...sleep." In addition to experiencing rapid eye movements, a person in REM sleep normally loses muscle tone in certain major muscle groups of the limbs, trunk, and neck.
RAPID EYE movements are significantly delayed in patients with glaucoma, results of a study published in Eye and Brain journal show.
Their eye movements tended to fall behind the moving object and then catch up again using rapid eye movements called "saccades".
The men, deprived of sleep in advance so they would slumber deeply, underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scans while awake, shortly after falling asleep, and during the sleep phase characterized by rapid eye movements and the occurrence of dreams.
Saccades, known more commonly as rapid eye movements, are caused when a person is thinking hard, according to Ehrlichman.
Vestibular stimulation triggers eye tracking that may mimic rapid eye movements during both dream sleep and EMDR, Ramachandran proposes.

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