rapid-eye-movement sleep

rapid-eye-movement sleep

[′rap·əd ¦ī ‚müv·mənt ‚slēp]
(psychology)
That part of the sleep cycle during which the eyes move rapidly, accompanied by a loss of muscle tone and a low-amplitude encephalogram recording; most dreaming occurs during this stage of sleep. Abbreviated REM sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
The neuroscientists attached electrodes to sleeping subjects' scalps to investigate whether dreaming or other brain processes that occur during rapid-eye-movement sleep periods play a role in the processing of emotions.
If you don't get into restorative rapid-eye-movement sleep, you will often (like postpartum women during the period of frequent feedings) have an increase in vivid dreams.
It also measures how much time is spent in rapid-eye-movement sleep - the period when most dreams happen.
Furthermore, severity of sleep apnea as measured by the apnea-hypopnea index, and the degree of oxygen desaturations during rapid-eye-movement sleep, accounted for more than 90% of the variability in measures of glucose tolerance including hemoglobin [A.
Heintz, Hatten, and other GENSAT researchers discovered that Gscl is produced by neurons in the interpeduncular nucleus, the brain region that also regulates rapid-eye-movement sleep.
The shortened sleep periods included a marked decline in rapid-eye-movement sleep, which is associated with dreaming.
In rapid-eye-movement sleep (dream sleep) muscles all over the body contract and relax.