raster

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raster

a pattern of horizontal scanning lines traced by an electron beam, esp on a television screen
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

raster

[′ras·tər]
(electronics)
A predetermined pattern of scanning lines that provides substantially uniform coverage of an area; in television the raster is seen as closely spaced parallel lines, most evident when there is no picture.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

raster

(hardware)
The area of a video display that is covered by sweeping the electron beam of the display in a series of horizontal lines from top to bottom. The beam then returns to the top during the vertical flyback interval.

See also CRT, frame buffer.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

raster

The horizontal lines (scan lines) displayed on a TV or computer monitor. This is the origin of the term "raster graphics," which is the major category that all bitmapped images and video frames fall into (GIF, JPEG, MPEG, etc.). See raster scan, raster display, analog video and bitmapped graphics.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The user-selected culvert location and flow accumulation output raster are both inputs to the ArcMap Snap Pour Point tool, which snaps the culvert to the cell of greatest flow accumulation within a specified distance of 30 meters to ensure that the culvert location lands on a GIS-derived stream flow path.
The clipped watershed land cover raster is produced by using the ArcMap Raster Clip function available within the Spatial Analyst toolbox.
Accordingly, it is purposeful to present the risk factors as continuous surfaces (raster gaphics), simultaneously accounting for the intensity of their occurrence.
The raster surface value was highest at the location of the drifts (raster pixel value was 100).
The thickness of loose overburden was estimated as difference between DTM and raster representing the bottom of Quaternary strata.
The initial data layer was a raster layer of coefficient C3, where there are 3 values for passable (1), passable with difficulty (0.5), and impassable terrain (0).
With the help of these models it is possible to create a so-called Cost Map, which is a raster file that is the basic input information for creation of the file of the searched route.
The formula for volume of half an ellipsoid overestimated mound volume compared with summing the area under a raster of the mound Vogt: 3D Characteristics of Fire Ant Mounds 555 surface (Paired t -test, P = 0.0046 and P = 0.0120 for Jackson and Oklahoma, respectively).
regressing y over the volume as determined by the raster method to yield slope m (0.7764) and intercept b (-0.2621), and adding a correction factor: y * (1 - m) + (0 - b) (Fig.
The RFTFs for rasters scanned L-R, R-L, and B-T were between 1 and 5 Hz lower than the corresponding FFF and increased in parallel to the FFFs with retinal illuminance (Figure 8).
At the lower screen luminances used in these studies, the 50 Hz refresh rate would have been above the FFF, and therefore the flicker was judged to be "imperceptible." As screen luminance increased, flicker would have become apparent for all scan directions and was described as "perceptible but not annoying." A further increase in screen luminance would have resulted in the appearance of rolling flicker when the field was scanned L-R, R-L, or B-T, but because the RFTF is generally much lower for rasters scanned T-B, the flicker perceived for that condition would not have had a directional component.
These two raster files were then merged using the "Mosaic to New Raster" in "Spatial Analyst".