rat guard

rat guard

[′rat ‚gärd]
(naval architecture)
A circular or conical metal shield placed on a mooring line to keep rats from boarding or leaving a vessel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He'd seen wharf rats mob a ship's rat guard. Heaped atop each other, they had fallen off the lines and into the water like panicked refugees at a closed border, they lusted so.
That morning in Naples, they had tied the ship to the pier as usual, but somehow, the rat guards had not been deployed.
"Rat guards," said Ops, "We need to rig the rat guards."
The rat guards had been stowed away by two sailors who had decided to get creative because the line-locker where they were normally kept had been filled with bicycles bought when the ship had visited Palma de Majorca two months before.
BM3 Squiciarini had actually given some consideration to telling Ops where the rat guards were placed.
And while Pender was debating whether the slaughter of the pigs was a cunny action of the rats, he almost passed out when he saw one the giant rat guard decapitating Wittaker's body and bringing it as an offering for one of his masters:
SN Danielle Hopper paints a rat guard used for mooring lines aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73).
Prewar Philippine magazines had many housekeeping articles with advice on 'modern' rat traps, rat bait and rat poison, while anthropologists in the Cordilleras pointed out 'rat guards' on house posts.
Sailors aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) apply rat guards to mooring lines as the ship arrives at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for refueling and supplies.