RPE

(redirected from rate of perceived exertion)
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RPE

(analytical chemistry)
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Rate of perceived exertion Group Pre treatment Post treatment 12.49[+ or -]3.23 10.34[+ or -]2.94 Group T Value P Value Significance 8.945 <0.007 ES Es: Extremely Significant Interpretation: The above table and graph shows pre and post comparison within the group
Load rather than contraction type influences rate of perceived exertion and pain.
(2015) determined in a group of subjects with CrossFit[R] experience, acute physiological responses (V[O.sub.2], oxygen consumption; HR, heart rate, [lactate], blood lactate concentration and RPE, rate of perceived exertion) to a W and G type WOD known respectively as "Fran" (thrusters + pull ups) and "Cindy" (pullups, push-ups, air squats).
Rate of perceived exertion (RPE) values were was significantly higher during the ACT condition.
There is a strong relationship between any rate of perceived exertion and VO2 max, as well as a significant correlation between heart rate (HR) and VO2 max.10 According to National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data, the highest proportions of overweight (23.0 < body mass index (BMI) 27.5 kg/m2) adjusted for age and sex were reported among Filipinos (46.5% overweight, 20.8% obese) and Asian Indians (46.7% overweight, 16.6% obese).11
Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of LI eccentric RE with and without BFR on heart rate (HR), rate pressure product (RPP), blood pressure (BP) parameters [systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (MAP)], oxygen saturation (Sp02) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE).
Well, the answer is wonderfully simple, and it's called RPE, Rate of Perceived Exertion. It's a scale from one to 10.
A good alternative to relying on heart rate to assess intensity during HIIT is using a rate of perceived exertion (RPE) scale.
Another way to monitor your effort level is using the rate of perceived exertion. This is a 1-10 scale for how hard you're working, with 1 being "not at all," and 10 being an "all-out effort" that can't be sustained for very long.
The intensity levels are based on a Rate of Perceived Exertion of one to 10 with one being low and 10 being high.
The 50 calories-per-serving drink promotes increased oxygen utilization, lactic acid buffering and an overall improved rate of perceived exertion, according to the company.
An alternative to heart rate for monitoring exercise intensity, is the rate of perceived exertion. The Borg Scale is commonly used, whereby a score of 12-14 on a 6-20 scale indicates a 'somewhat hard' workout.