ratio of specific heats

ratio of specific heats

[′rā·shō əv spə′sif·ik ′hēts]
(physical chemistry)
The ratio of specific heat at constant pressure to specific heat at constant volume, γ = Cp / Cv .
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While perhaps somewhat intimidating at first glance, this equation only requires knowledge of the inlet and outlet pressures, the inlet temperature, the ratio of specific heats k, and the loss factor Kloss.
This result, however, could not be reconciled with the experimentally obtained value [Gamma] = 1.408 for the ratio of specific heats: the theorem implied that the ratio [Beta] of total kinetic energy to translatory energy had to be [Beta] = [E.sub.kin]/[E.sub.trans] = 2, whereas from the value [Gamma] =1.408 it followed that this ratio was 1.634, in agreement with Clausius's results.
[Beta] has a constant average value, depending on the nature of the molecules, which can be calculated from the ratio of specific heats. It is remarkable that nowhere in the article he mentioned that one could also derive the value of [Beta] theoretically with the help of the equipartition theorem.
Having introduced the treatment of molecular motion in terms of degrees of freedom and having restated the theorem of equipartition (which Boltzmann had meanwhile proved and extended to a theorem of complete equipartition over all degrees of freedom), Maxwell obtained a general expression for the ratio of specific heats:
In 1871 Boltzmann returned to the anomaly.(24) He proved the theorem of complete equipartition and, having accepted the diatomic nature of most gas molecules, he derived the theoretical value [Gamma] = 1.33 for the ratio of specific heats. The anomalous experimental value [Gamma] 1.41, Boltzmann suggested, might be explained by interaction of molecules with the ether (Maxwell [1986], p.232, later refuted this hypothesis).