ratites


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Related to ratites: Struthioniformes

ratites

[′ra‚tīts]
(vertebrate zoology)
A group of flightless, mostly large, running birds comprising several orders and including the emus, cassowaries, kiwis, and ostriches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously, it was thought ratites all shared a common flightless ancestor about 80 million years ago and their worldwide dispersal occurred before the supercontinent of Gondwanaland broke up.
Though no one knows exactly how many ratites there are in the United States, industry insiders put the figure at between 100,000 and 200,000 birds.
Ratites are a family of flightless birds that have no keel bone.
Traditionally, biologists have placed the flightless moa with the modern ratites, the taxonomic group that includes other flightless birds such as ostriches and kiwis.
The mating system of ratites and tinamous: an evolutionary perspective.
Elegant-crested tinamou (Eudromia elegans) belong to the family Tinamidae, which includes 47 species and 9 genera of birds native to Central and South America, and are related to ratites under the superorder Palaeognathae.
The smaller content of yolk mass in rhea eggs is associated with a shorter incubation period (40 days) compared to other ratites (Emu: 56 days; Cassowary: 50-52 days; Kiwi: 70-90 days; Davis 2002) but similar to that of ostriches (40-45 days).
Although various combinations of opioids, [alpha]-2 adrenergic agonists, and dissociative agents have been used in ratites, few effective chemical immobilization protocols have been documented for rheas (Rhea species).
Ratites to ducks, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, Australia.
This form of zinc toxicosis, while previously reported in different avian species, has been only rarely described in ratites.
Use of xylazine, butorphanol, tiletamine-zolazepare, and isoflurane for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in ratites.
Use of xylazine, butorphanol, tiletamine-zolaze pam, and isoflurane for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in ratites.