rawinsonde


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rawinsonde

[′rā·wən‚sänd]
(meteorology)
A method of upper-air observation consisting of an evaluation of the wind speed and direction, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity aloft by means of a balloon-borne radiosonde tracked by a radar or radio direction finder.
References in periodicals archive ?
PBL depth time series over EOAS-Santiago (at 06 UTC and 18 UTC every date) modelled by WRF model (CTRL line) and different CALMET model resolutions (other lines) and estimated from the available EOAS-Santiago rawinsonde data (dots), only 2006 periods (P2 and P3).
There were several reasons for the relative lack of jets in the remaining rawinsonde profiles.
Forecasters at the National Weather Service (NWS) launch rawinsondes in 72 locations in the lower 48 twice a day at about 1100 UTC and 2300 UTC.
However, when comparing rawinsonde observations with reanalysis products and with climate models, large uncertainties were found for stable conditions.
During the IBD in the morning hours, five rawinsonde launches were made along the CASPER track (Fig.
RAP 975-925 hPa Rawinsonde States (2016) Mean absolute error-Wind speed Gulf of Djalalova et al.
2, based on a rawinsonde released outside the tornadic rainband at the Hong Kong International Airport at 0600 UTC (1400 LST), which is about 100 km to the southeast and an hour before the miniature supercell became tornadic.
Embedding during Exercise Blue Chromite 16, the team successfully deployed two upper air tactical rawinsondes (sensors attached to weather balloons) in advance of a parachute jump, collecting and relaying real-time upper level wind data to jumpmasters.
Types of observations used in the analysis include land surface observations of surface pressure; ocean surface observations of sea level pressure and winds; sea level winds inferred from backscatter returns from space-borne radars; conventional upper-air data from rawinsondes (e.g., height, temperature, wind, and moisture); additional sources of upper-air data including drop sondes, pilot balloons, aircraft winds; and remotely sensed information from satellites (e.g.