rays


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Related to rays: Manta rays

rays

High albedo (bright) streaks that surround the youngest Moon craters and help to assign them to the Copernican System – the most recent era in lunar history. Rays consist of crater ejecta that has not yet been darkened by radiation or by admixture with local materials. The most prominent systems are associated with Tycho and Giordano Bruno. Similar bright features have been found around craters on other Solar-System bodies.
References in classic literature ?
The hull of the Nautilus, resembling a long shoal, disappeared by degrees; but its lantern, when darkness should overtake us in the waters, would help to guide us on board by its distinct rays.
This ray is separated from the other rays of the sun by means of finely adjusted instruments placed upon the roof of the huge building, three-quarters of which is used for reservoirs in which the ninth ray is stored.
And rays from God shot down that meteor chain And hallow'd all the beauty twice again, Save when, between th' Empyrean and that ring, Some eager spirit flapp'd his dusky wing.
The Prince could only appear or speak under the form of a Rainbow, and it was therefore necessary that the sun should shine on water so as to enable the rays to form themselves.
It was the same panorama he had admired from that spot the day before, but now the whole place was full of troops and covered by smoke clouds from the guns, and the slanting rays of the bright sun, rising slightly to the left behind Pierre, cast upon it through the clear morning air penetrating streaks of rosy, golden tinted light and long dark shadows.
The rays of the colored suns were now shut out from them forever, for the last chinks had been filled up in the wall that separated their prison from the Land of the Mangaboos.
that is to say, invisible, because of the rays of the sun.
I looked along the two rays of light, and I saw down into his inmost heart.
But this is not the story of Windpeter Winters nor yet of his son Hal who worked on the Wills farm with Ray Pearson.
To Felix, just then, life was flat, stale and unprofitable because it was his turn to go home with Sara Ray.
The Ray flickered up and down the towing path, licking off the people who ran this way and that, and came down to the water's edge not fifty yards from where I stood.
Behind, is its own pressure held in leash of spurred on by the lift-shunts; before it, the vacuum where Fleury's Ray dances in violet-green bands and whirled turbillons of flame.