reaction time


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reaction time

[rē′ak·shən ‚tīm]
(physiology)
The interval between application of a stimulus and the beginning of the response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Significant increases of reaction time and increases in the number of lapses were found in all eighteen volunteers.
3 Reaction time may be assessed by various methods and has three different types based on these methods: simple, choice and recognition reaction times.
Findings of present study show that auditory reaction time and visual reaction time decreased comparatively for both males and females among the mouthpiece users.
As it is evident from the results, the required amount for the most catalysts used for this purpose is more than 1 mol% and also the required reaction time is longer.
All the data obtained from personal information form, reaction time chronometer and Stroop Test TBAG Form was analysed with SPSS program.
Then, the reaction time task for the driver to perceive a pedestrian at night was performed by ten participants under the configuration shown in Figure 5.
2009): The modified flanker task measures reaction time and response accuracy, which are aspects of inhibitory control and executive function (Kamijo et al.
In the second study, Reaction Time, Movement Time, and Response Time pre-post comparisons for forehand and backhand lateral lunge movement among the 4 groups are presented in Tables 5 to 8 and Figure 14 (with .
In this study, auditory and visual reaction time tests were performed in order to test the simple and choice reaction time.
Lead researcher Dr Gareth Hagger-Johnson said that the reaction time is thought to reflect a basic aspect of the central nervous system and speed of information processing is considered a basic cognitive ability, and a simple test of reaction time in adulthood can predict survival, independently of age, sex, ethnic group and socio-economic background.
A new study reported in the journal Brain and Cognition found that reaction times are up to 10 per cent faster while chewing gum, and that as many as eight different areas of the brain are affected, Science Daily Reported.