reaction zone

reaction zone

[rē′ak·shən ‚zōn]
(chemical engineering)
In a catalytic reactor vessel, the location or zone within the vessel where the bulk of the chemical reaction takes place.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of swirling flows to control the combustion processes is actual and essential, because of the hypothesis suggesting that the swirl flows allow the enhanced mixing of the reactants in the flame reaction zone and stabilization of the processes of fuel combustion and heat energy production.
Figure 2 illustrates a tubular interfacial polycondensation reactor process that consists of a mixing zone and a reaction zone. This reactor configuration is commonly used in industrial processes as reported in patent literature [10-14].
The spray structures with the reaction zone were obtained, and the distribution of droplets was analyzed.
The present ultralean flames may be a borderline case and closer to the broken reaction zone boundary with computed Karlovitz numbers [1] (Ka=[[tau].sub.ch]/[[tau].sub.k], where [[tau].sub.ch] and [[tau].sub.k] are the chemical and Kolmogorov timescales) of about 80 and estimated local grid based Karlovitz numbers of even higher values.
The internal recycle reactor for phosphorus recovery is designed with both inner and outer tubes, including mixing reaction zone, crystallization reaction zone, centrifugal solid-liquid separation zone, crystal return flow zone, effluent overflow area, and phosphorus collection area [20].
The conversion coating layer on graphite, fabricated in reaction zone (2), showed a chemical composition (Si : C) of approximately 1: 1.
As shown in Figure 2, the catalyzing channel includes three inlets for injecting the sample containing PODs, UHP, and TMB, respectively, a mixing zone (8 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height) with a magnetic stirrer (2 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length) for online mixing of these three solutions, a reaction zone (1.8 mm in width, 1 mm in height, and 60 mm in length) for efficiently performing catalytic reaction, and an outlet for flowing out the blue intermediate catalysate.
The major difference between the two combustion models is the thickness of the reaction zone. A comparatively thin layer has been observed for the WM model in comparison with the TPDF model where the reaction zone is more distributed due to the consideration of turbulent fluctuations within a cell.
It is composed of several reaction zones (Figure 3), which are described as follows: (1) grey color reaction zone (2-8.5 mm in thickness) consisting of calcite + dolomite + graphite; (2) light grey color reaction zone (1-3.5 mm in thickness) consisting of diopside + calcite [+ or -] tremolite; (3) brown reddish color reaction zone (1.5-20 mm in thickness) consisting of Ti-clinohumite + calcite + clinochlore [+ or -] muscovite [+ or -] fluorapatite [+ or -] graphite; (4) orange color reaction zone (2-6.5 mm in thickness) consisting of Ti-clinohumite + calcite + dolomite + clinochlore + rutile [+ or -] muscovite; (5) light yellow color reaction zone (2-5.5 mm in thickness) consisting of dolomite + calcite + forsterite (antigorite).
Among other benefits associated with the rapid vertical flow technique are the separation of sample and conjugate, which is conducive to better performance, and the "hook effect": in lateral flow, undiluted specimen will overwhelm the internal color conjugate upon reaction, prior to moving toward the reaction zone.