read


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read

[rēd]
(computer science)
To acquire information, usually from some form of storage in a computer.
To convert magnetic spots, characters, or punched holes into electrical impulses.
(electronics)
To generate an output corresponding to the pattern stored in a charge storage tube.

read

To input into the computer from a peripheral device (keyboard, mouse, disk, etc.) or the network. Like reading a book or playing a DVD, reading does not destroy what is read. The term also refers to accessing the contents of memory.

Every Read Is Also a Write
Every transfer of data is a "read" from one location and a "write" to another. Reading a sector in a hard drive means writing that data into memory. When data are copied from one memory area to another, the data are "read out of" one section of RAM and "written into" another part. See write and read/write.
References in periodicals archive ?
What book did you struggle to read? And why was it necessary that you read it to the end?There have been more than one: gifts which I would not necessarily have bought for myself but which I felt obliged to read in gratitude and as courtesy.From where you stand, what is the most dangerous thing about not having the culture of reading rooted in us?The inability to express elaborate thought.
This includes children who were stronger readers in the first place being more likely to read this type of text.
Most people are reading for passing exams, but there are some peoples who read to get awareness.
Adults who are well read can model this for their children by encouraging reading every day.
10 read the text slowly for better understanding while equal number of the respondents i.e.
While many educators still use and believe in self-selected reading, many others hold that self-selected reading detracts from instructional time and that there is no guarantee that students actually read during the scheduled in-class reading time (Von Sprecken & Krashen, 1998).
Learning to read takes practice - both in school and out of school.
National Literacy Trust research has found less than a third of young people read outside school every day, so it's joined up with the Premier League to run Premier League Reading Stars, an annual initiative which has enlisted the help of 20 Premier League footballers to use children's passion for football to motivate them to enjoy reading.
The latest research touches on reading aloud to children of all ages, the impact of reading independently for fun at school and at home, the importance of frequent reading, and the books children want most to read. Frequent readers are defined as children who read books for fun 5 or more days a week, compared to infrequent readers, who read less than one day a week.
Three in five youngsters (59.8%) say they read text messages outside of class at least once a month, while half (50%) say they read e-mails at least that often.
Asking and recording how students learnt to read and what skills they use when they read, can provide a great insight and strong direction for teachers to help students improve their reading.
One idea that the boys came up with was called 'Place 2 Read'.