read-in

read-in

[′rēd¦in]
(computer science)
To sense information contained in some source and transmit this information to an internal storage.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fifteenth National African American Read-In Sunday, February 1, and Monday, February 2, 2004, sponsored by the Black Caucus of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and by the NCTE.
It all started during a "read-in" at NEA's 1997 Representative Assembly last July.
The armed robbery counts were dismissed outright, without prejudice, and not as read-ins, at the time of his sentencing on the intimidation charges.
What followed was a relentless campaign including protests and read-ins. And just days before the budget meeting, it was announced they would be saved.
Mr Forde has organised celebrity read-ins of his book at local schools for the Children in Need Appeal.
The likely closure of many of our public libraries, as an 'easy' target in the cutbacks being imposed on public services, has met with howls of anguish from many journalists, literary people, and library users, and a national day of action in February saw read-ins, marches and petitions all over the country in protest at closure plans.
LIBRARY lovers will take part in a series of "read-ins" today in protest over threatened closures.
In Indianapolis, neighborhoods around the branches facing possible closure became very active, holding read-ins, marches and letter-writing campaigns.
Book fairs are held throughout the school year and parents are invited to participate in after-school "Community Read-Ins" that promote family literacy.
That's what artists and activists urged on March 3 in roughly 1,000 national and international read-ins of Aristophanes just-say-no play Lysistrata.
Events can be actual visit, "proxy" visits, "read-ins" or visits by e-mail.
On campus during the week, we organized read-ins against the war.