ready

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ready

at or to the ready (of a rifle) in the position normally adopted immediately prior to aiming and firing

ready

[′red·ē]
(ordnance)
Of a weapon, aimed, loaded, and prepared to fire.
References in classic literature ?
Having had great experience of the sex, and being perfectly acquainted with all those little artifices which find the readiest road to their hearts, Mr Chuckster, on taking his ground, planted one hand on his hip, and with the other adjusted his flowing hair.
were questions immediately following with the readiest good-humour.
This, however, is the readiest and, since fortune has put it into our hands, I should be culpable if I neglected it.
The involuntariness of the figures and similes is the most remarkable thing; one loses all perception of what constitutes the figure and what constitutes the simile; everything seems to present itself as the readiest, the correctest and the simplest means of expression.
RCC was the most mature and readiest line of business that could be offered on the market.
The latter is one aspect of the clarity argument, which Whewell repeats a few years later in a lecture on Ricardo: '[W]hen our object is to deduce the results of a few precise and universal principles, mathematical processes offer to us both the readiest and safest method' (Whewell [1833] 1991, 119).
Moreover, firms often find that the readiest and cheapest access to
The arts are indeed the practice in which indigenous people generally have found the readiest recognition in the present period.
By positing a Macbeth-like usurpation of legitimate by illegitimate theater, this commentator points to melodramatic spectrality as the readiest solution to the problem of staging Shakespeare's ghosts.
And therein lies the kernel paradox of Tennysonian formalism: the poet's closest readers--conscious listeners, all of them, and readiest to recognize his conscious craft--hearken to things not-yet-conscious.
The readiest narrative explanation for this interruption is that it prevents Major's speech from becoming monotonous.
The readiest explanation for the alarming degree of disaffection is that Washington in fact fails regularly and often spectacularly.