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read

[rēd]
(computer science)
To acquire information, usually from some form of storage in a computer.
To convert magnetic spots, characters, or punched holes into electrical impulses.
(electronics)
To generate an output corresponding to the pattern stored in a charge storage tube.

read

To input into the computer from a peripheral device (keyboard, mouse, disk, etc.) or the network. Like reading a book or playing a DVD, reading does not destroy what is read. The term also refers to accessing the contents of memory.

Every Read Is Also a Write
Every transfer of data is a "read" from one location and a "write" to another. Reading a sector in a hard drive means writing that data into memory. When data are copied from one memory area to another, the data are "read out of" one section of RAM and "written into" another part. See write and read/write.
References in classic literature ?
Or shall I hear the name of Plato and never read his book?
If we will read newspapers, why not skip the gossip of Boston and take the best newspaper in the world at once?
I would read it," said the curate, "if the time would not be better spent in sleeping.
Well then, in that case," said the curate, "I will read it, if it were only out of curiosity; perhaps it may contain something pleasant.
When I was growing up in western Massachusetts, "reading" happened in two places: the classroom at my small independent school and at nighttime when my parents read to my sister and me.
2 -- color) Moises Robles, 7, reads to Bonnie and handler Michael Siwula as part of a literacy program that employs gentle trained dogs as listeners for youngsters who find reading difficult.
13, 2004) noted that "While trade paperback, street-lit editions sell most to black women and girls between the ages of 13 and 30, it is also read by an even more elusive and desirable demographic group: young black men.
During the school year, the teacher has worked to increase her students' metacognitive abilities and to encourage her students to read for pleasure.
Although Ethan couldn't read, print riveted his attention with a power that neither brand-new toys nor gooey birthday cake could approach.
NR Meter--A meter that is not registering and giving actual reads.
McManus provides a very useful overview of what we do know about reading practices of aristocratic women in chapter 1, looking at library inventories, prescriptions for women's reading, and reading journals, and concluding that Spenser's women readers shared the political awareness of his general readership and that women read broadly, not always conforming to dicta about what they should read.