strip

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strip

1. short for airstrip
2. Philately a horizontal or vertical row of three or more unseparated postage stamps
3. NZ short for dosing strip

strip

[strip]
(engineering)
To remove insulation from a wire.
To break or otherwise damage the threads of a nut or bolt.
(materials)
A long, narrow piece of rigid material of uniform width.
(mining engineering)
To remove coal, stone, or other material from a quarry or from a working that is near the surface of the earth.
(ordnance)
To dissassemble a piece of equipment, such as a gun, in order to clean, repair, or transport it.

strip

1. Any material which is long and narrow, usually of uniform width.
2.See board, 1.
3. To damage the threads on a nut or bolt.
4. To remove formwork.

strip

stripclick for a larger image
i. A narrow surface for takeoff, landing, or taxiing of airplanes—specifically an airstrip. Normally, it is used in combination, as in fighter strip, landing strip, etc.
ii. Any number of photographs taken along a photo flight line, usually at an approximately constant altitude.
iii. To disassemble a piece of equipment into its basic parts to repair, service, or transport it.
References in periodicals archive ?
8% (21 603 of 22 317) of the glucose and urine reagent strip test records had documentation of the name of the individual who performed the test.
Evaluation of the centrifuged and Gram-stained smear, urinalysis, and reagent strip testing to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria in obstetric patients.
Arterial glucose measurements were made at baseline and hourly thereafter by glucose oxidase reagent strips.
Reagent strips, SPRs, and all necessary standards and controls for monitoring correct system performance are packaged in kits of 60 tests.
A five-grade scale of color on the reagent strip determined the amount of polymorphonuclear cells in the culture, which had to reach at least 250/mL for the diagnosis.
The effect of variations in hematocrit, mean cell volume and red blood count on reagent strip tests for glucose.
A urine protein estimate obtained with reagent strips (Clinitek Atlas[R]; Siemens) was 30 mg/dL; however, quantitative measurement of the total protein concentration (UniCel[R] DxC 800; Beckman Coulter) of a second urine sample yielded a value of 980 mg/dL.
All samples were thawed, vortex-mixed, and centrifuged at 1500g for 15 min before assay for serum transferrin, salivary transferrin, or testing by Hemastix Reagent Strip.