real crystal

real crystal

[′rēl ′krist·əl]
(crystallography)
A crystal for which the finite extent of the crystal and its various imperfections and defects are taken into account.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hardware also includes four real crystal finials giving it an elegant look.
If you're a football fan you'll also register something else as this point - that the club (which was formed in 1905, by workers at the real Crystal Palace, just up the road) have played at Selhurst Park since it was built in 1924.
He covers bulk crystals as three-dimensional lattices, crystal layers as two-dimensional lattices, ideal single-crystal surfaces, real crystal surfaces, adsorbate layers, the experimental analysis of real crystal surfaces, and nanotubes.
The psychic in the strip mall is as good a prognosticator as the so-called experts, but she doesn't sell newspapers, although at least she has a real crystal ball.
There is no proof that Hairy actually saw all of these combination habits in real crystal specimens.
Thank goodness there are no real crystal balls to warn us of what might be ahead.
Northrop Frye said that our only real crystal ball is a rearview mirror, and in our global era it needs to be as wide-angled as possible.
These include ultra-mini transflectance immersion probes with interchangeable light path tips, fiber optic fluorescence devices that allow remote measurements of physically difficult samples, and IR sample cards with a real crystal substrate.
It's difficult to image micrometer-size defects zipping along in a real crystal, he points out.
He said: "We used real crystal and marble and many items were made by firms that supplied the original Titanic.
In a real crystal, any spot must belong to one half or the other, but the actual pattern of intersection between the two halves may be very complex, much as it is on a Dauphine-twinned quartz crystal.