reason

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reason

1. Philosophy the intellect regarded as a source of knowledge, as contrasted with experience
2. Logic grounds for a belief; a premise of an argument supporting that belief
3. reasons of State political justifications for an immoral act

reason

the capacity of the human mind to make logical inferences, undertake rational arguments, understand the world, solve problems. What the nature, social determinants and limits of this capacity are, however, is much debated. See RATIONALISM IDEALISM, EMPIRICISM, ONTOLOGY; see also PRACTICAL REASONING.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to become practical reasoners (on MacIntyre's account), we must
EMERALD currently deploys two deductive reasoners, based on the logic programming paradigm: R-Reasoner and Prova-Reasoner, which deploy the R-DEVICE and Prova rule engines, respectively.
Such information may help reasoners develop expectations for conditions of truth or falsity and may help to explain common errors in reasoning.
Two Pure Reasoners starting from the same premise can respectively arrive at a virtuous precept and one so evil even the most pragmatic politicians blanch.
By having two separate reasoners performance can be improved.
The Reasoner catalogues document the popular hybrids of the time, and the Reasoners developed many of those hybrids," he says.
The comments were used to formulate interview questions to identify differences between the high and low clinical reasoners.
Case-based reasoners (CBRs) contain a set of stored records or "cases" which are compared with new inputs ("inquiries").
Ronald Meek took reasoners to the other side of the globe in his discussions of Japanese Marxism.
One day, when I was visiting the Thompsons, Edward gathered a bundle of New Reasoners from the late fifties and gave them to me.
These issues lead to a consideration of the distinctive virtues required of us if we are to become independent practical reasoners able to acknowledge our dependence on others in arriving at that state of independence as well as continuing dependence on others with whom we participate in the relationships of giving and receiving through which we pursue the goods that constitute human flourishing.