Rebuild

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rebuild

[rē′bild]
(engineering)
To restore to a condition comparable to new by disassembling the item to determine the condition of each of its component parts, and reassembling it, using serviceable, rebuilt, or new assemblies, subassemblies, and parts.

Rebuild

To build again. To make extensive structural repairs after a structure has fallen into disuse through neglect, vandalism, or natural disaster, such as fire or flood..
References in periodicals archive ?
Rocco Panetta, President of Plastic Machinery & Parts states, “Servicing the converting industry requires PMP to offer a repair and rebuilding option.
Used to be an old myth that rebuilding a feedwater heater takes longer than installing a new replacement, or that it couldn't be done with the unit in operation or on-line.
In a response letter on the same day, Ringler shot back that the Comptroller was "suffering from serious misinformation with regard to the Port Authority's financial commitment to Ground Zero," and said that the Authority has committed to spending between $2 billion and $3 billion on the site's rebuilding.
should be an early question to ask in the rebuilding of New Orleans.
In RAID 5, if you lose a second hard drive while the first one is still rebuilding, you lose 100 percent of your data.
The property insurers contend that under the terms of the insurance policies, a theoretical measure for rebuilding time must be used.
Both Kaplan and Park Nicollet CEO David Wessner believe they have just begun a process that may take a decade or more of rebuilding every process, whether clinical, physical plant, or administrative, in their systems.
Tire building equipment, including a first stage radial tire building machine, an assembly line for rebuilding tire presses and a rebuilt and modified 55" BOM tire press, is featured in the company's six-page, four-color brochure.
And because of the work done to help the Oakland fire victims, those affected by the Southern California fires have clear guidance on many of the issues that face them in the rebuilding process.
168(k)-1T(b)(3)(i) allows the reconditioning/ rebuilding costs (but not the used property's cost) to meet this requirement.
Their story is not unique, and it illustrates one of the paradoxes involved in rebuilding a country as devastated as Afghanistan: With the country finally at peace (for the most part), reconstruction is tinder way, but for some people, things may get worse before they get better.