recess

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Related to recesses: dejects

recess

1. Anatomy a small cavity or depression in a bodily organ, part, or structure
2. US and Canadian a break between classes at a school

Recess

Receding part or space, such as a cavity in a wall for a door, an alcove, or a niche.

recess

[′rē‚ses]
(engineering)
A surface groove or depression.
(geology)
An indentation occurring in a surface, bounded by a straight line.
An area having the axial traces of folds concave toward the outer edge of the folded belt.

recess

1. Any shallow depression in a surface.
2. A shallow depression in a floor; a sinkage.
References in classic literature ?
These latter are large, reaching down to the floor - have deep recesses - and open on an Italian veranda.
But none of Hawthorne's fables are without a profound and distant reach into the recesses of nature and of being.
She raised her moist and beautiful eyes, and looked at William with a glance full of meaning, which was calculated to stir up in the recesses of his heart the clemency which was slumbering there.
Like all woods, it seemed to be holding and enfolding secrets in its recesses,--secrets whose charm is only to be won by entering in and patiently seeking.
As he did not, however, outwardly express any such disgust, it would be an ill office in us to pay a visit to the inmost recesses of his mind, as some scandalous people search into the most secret affairs of their friends, and often pry into their closets and cupboards, only to discover their poverty and meanness to the world.
The sea, or rather the vast river of ice, wound among its dependent mountains, whose aerial summits hung over its recesses.
Winkle did entertain considerable misgivings in the very lowest recesses of his own heart, relative to his equestrian skill; but, as he would not have them even suspected, on any account, he at once replied with great hardihood, 'Certainly.
Three or four buxom girls speedily dispersed in search of the different articles in requisition, while a couple of large-headed, circular-visaged males rose from their seats in the chimney- corner (for although it was a May evening their attachment to the wood fire appeared as cordial as if it were Christmas), and dived into some obscure recesses, from which they speedily produced a bottle of blacking, and some half-dozen brushes.
As noted by Nokken and Sala (2000, 104), regular recess appointments to major independent regulatory boards would allow presidents to "end-run an intransigent Senate by filling vacancies during recesses with hand-picked appointees who, presumably, would do his/her bidding.
evidence suggests that short recesses of ten or thirty days, which delay
Many walls with hive recesses probably disappeared before recording began, but of the surviving walls the greatest number seem to have been built in England during the 17th and 18th centuries, in Scotland and Ireland during the 18th century, and in Wales and France during the 18th and 19th centuries.
In addition, the stepping recesses of the building's main entry will further strengthen it's presence on the waterfront.