recession curve

recession curve

[ri′sesh·ən ‚kərv]
(hydrology)
A hydrograph showing the decrease of the runoff rate after rainfall or the melting of snow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once we separate out the baseflow time series, we connect each individual baseflow recession to the master recession curve according to the low streamflows in the tails of the recessions.
As an alternative to modelling the recession curve mathematically, one can derive other parameters such as the exact cap diameter for a particular seasonal date, or the maximum recession velocity, enabling comparisons over successive years.
However, conditions have changed and all economies are at one point or another on the recession curve.
High uniformity of surface irrigation is achieved if the advance curve (time of the advancing water front versus advance distance) and recession curve (time when water disappears from the soil surface versus distance) of the irrigation water are parallel (Figure 16-3).
The recession curve is assumed to vary linearly from the value obtained from Equation 16.
11) Calculate the new recession curve and infiltrated depths and volumes.
seasonal recession and recession curve displacement, are discussed for this purpose.
KEY WORDS: Precipitation, groundwater recharge, runoff, evapotranspiration, seasonal recession method, and recession curve displacement method.
Two popular, inexpensive and independent methods, which use the stream flow partition techniques, are the seasonal recession method by Meyboom (1961) and the recession curve displacement method by Rorabaugh (1964).
10,11,12) With the recession curve it is possible to compute the ice thickness between the cap edge and the pole (for a simple procedure see Geneslay's article).
Several recession curves (R-Ls), determined from visual telescopic observations made over a period of 140 years, between 1862 and 2010, are examined here.
Equation [5] can therefore be used as an analytical function for the interpolation of points in recession curves.