reciprocal inhibition


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reciprocal inhibition

[ri′sip·rə·kəl ‚in·ə′bish·ən]
(physiology)
In muscular movement, the simultaneous relaxation of one muscle and the contraction of its antagonist.
(psychology)
The modification of a behavioral pattern by the conditioning of responses that are incompatible with the response to be eliminated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reciprocal inhibition (Wolpe, 1954, 1968) is at the center of effective treatments for PTSD; it desensitizes hyperarousal effects and integrates dissociated, suppressed, or repressed trauma memories (Boudewyns & Hyer, 1990; Foa et al.
These exercises, through principle of Reciprocal Inhibition, developed alternate emotional responses towards Mathematics Phobia and was made to be incompatible with it.
Reciprocal inhibition is a reflex muscular relaxation that occurs in the muscle that is opposite the muscle where the golgi tendon organ is stimulated.
It is possible that other spinal mechanisms, such as recurrent inhibition and/or reciprocal inhibition, are responsible for the depression of the H-reflex seen in dancers.
Therefore, these stretches can be used in the midst of competition to relieve cramping and tightness, by increasing--not decreasing--localized blood flow as well as the reciprocal inhibition factor.
I have diagnosed and treated PTSD with good success for more than 30 years using a combination of hypnotic/relaxation techniques plus exposure-based, in vitro guided imagery treatments using reciprocal inhibition and systematic de-sensitization coupled to cognitive restructuring, and I believe that these are very effective treatments.
By stretching and releasing, you work through a muscle's reciprocal inhibition and thereby stretch more deeply and effectively.
Reciprocal inhibition and desensitization processes are most often done in vitro, producing good office-based results.
However, it is essential that mental health professionals use clear, focused treatments that work--such as guided imagery, reciprocal inhibition, and systematic desensitization.
However, in my experience, the use of relaxation techniques, reciprocal inhibition, guided imagery, and systematic desensitization have been the most effective short-term treatments.

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