recluse

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recluse

a person who lives in solitude to devote himself to prayer and religious meditation; a hermit, anchorite, or anchoress
References in classic literature ?
A recluse sees only two or three persons, and allows them all their room; they spread themselves at large.
In Wordsworth's prefatory advertisement to the first edition of The Prelude, published in 1850, it is stated that that work was intended to be introductory to The Recluse: and that The Recluse, if completed, would have consisted of three parts.
It was a rather gloomy dwelling for one who was neither a recluse nor a student, and I think it gave something of its character to me-- perhaps some of its former occupant's character; for always I felt in it a certain melancholy that was not in my natural disposition, nor, I think, due to loneliness.
A man may have as much wisdom in the possession of an affluent fortune, as any beggar in the streets; or may enjoy a handsome wife or a hearty friend, and still remain as wise as any sour popish recluse, who buries all his social faculties, and starves his belly while he well lashes his back.
I had lived a placid, uneventful, sedentary existence all my days--the life of a scholar and a recluse on an assured and comfortable income.
Too readily doth the recluse reach his hand to any one who meeteth him.
Planudes, however, was no mere recluse, shut up in his monastery.
And that was a day of romance; If those robber-barons were somewhat grim and drunken ogres, they had a certain grandeur of the wild beast in them,--they were forest boars with tusks, tearing and rending, not the ordinary domestic grunter; they represented the demon forces forever in collision with beauty, virtue, and the gentle uses of life; they made a fine contrast in the picture with the wandering minstrel, the soft-lipped princess, the pious recluse, and the timid Israelite.
AMERICAN novelist JD Salinger's desire for solitude only resulted in him becoming one of the world's most famous recluses.
Li notes that no historical figure other than Tao is identified as a recluse-poet in Shipin and shows that while dynastic histories list many recluses in this period few were poets, fewer still made it into Shipin, and none is cited for eremitic qualities.
But others, like novelist Stephen King, are virtual recluses.
In addition, many spiders, including brown recluses, are known to spin silk retreats (Hite et al.