recording density

recording density

[ri′kȯrd·iŋ ‚den·səd·ē]
(computer science)
The amount of data that can be stored in a unit length of magnetic tape, usually expressed in bits per inch or characters per inch.
References in periodicals archive ?
To increase capacity per drive, we can increase both the platter count and the areal recording density (the product of linear and track densities).
As technology progresses and more information is distributed across the world in various high definition formats, innovative methods for storing large volumes of data at ultra-high recording density and at ultra-high speed will be required.
Compared with the conventional technology that stores magnetic data on a horizontal plane of the HD media, the PMR technology enables vertical magnetic recording, resulting in a dramatic increase in recording density.
Singapore's national research institute, the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, working with the National University of Singapore and the Data Storage Institute, have "developed a process that can increase the data recording density of hard disks to 3.3 terabits per square inch, six times the recording density of current models," according to a statement.
For the LTO-5 development, Fujifilm said it further advanced its Nanocubic technology and successfully achieved higher recording density. LTO-5 tapes also have finer metal particles (78% of the size of LTO-4), nanodispersion technology with a new binder system and an advanced nanocoating technology to achieve a much smoother and more uniform magnetic layer resulting in significant decrease in the tape surface defects.
As a result of this increased recording density, the EcoGreen F3 drive is more power efficient by supporting a capacity up to 2TB with four disks.
The new cartridge is Sony's first DAT product to use the company's Advanced Metal Evaporated (AME) technology to increase recording density and yield higher capacity.
As the recording density is increased each year, the head-disk clearance is getting narrower which makes the chance of head touching down and taking off more frequently.
This efficient recording density is typically nearly five times greater than most linear-serpentine methods.
In addition to VHS and compact VHS, there is 8 mm and two digital formats, hi-8 and mini-DV, which offers a much higher recording density than VHS.
By 2006, the storage industry aims to pack 0.16 [Tbit/cm.sup.2] on state-of-the-art magnetic disk drives --a recording density 40 times greater than todays top commercial offerings.
The recording density for the 6Gb/s demonstration was approximately 5b/ [micro] [m.sup.2].

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