records


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records

References in classic literature ?
"The only record I have with me," explained the phonograph, "is one the Magician attached just before we had our quarrel.
He often studied his records, examining and poring over them with absorbing interest until far into the night; but what he found there-- if he found anything--he revealed to no one.
As we have no public notoriety, no concurrent testimony, no records to support and corroborate what we deliver, it becomes us to keep within the limits not only of possibility, but of probability too; and this more especially in painting what is greatly good and amiable.
In process of time, as the arts of war developed, it increased in size and strength, and although recorded details are lacking, the history is written not merely in the stone of its building, but is inferred in the changes of structure.
The completion of the Tellurionical Records closed what Lavalle himself was pleased to call the theoretical side of his labours--labours from which the youngest and least impressionable planeur might well have shrunk.
And now, if you are truly repentant, come and record."
The many cases on record of a formation conformably covered, after an enormous interval of time, by another and later formation, without the underlying bed having suffered in the interval any wear and tear, seem explicable only on the view of the bottom of the sea not rarely lying for ages in an unaltered condition.
Browning was a mere boy, it is recorded that he debated within himself whether he should not become a painter or a musician as well as a poet.
And what's more, if there's anything in it, why ain't Bob Henderson smoking along to record?"
These men suffered the bitterest death that has been recorded in the history of those mountains, freighted as that history is with grisly tragedies.
There are about thirty cases on record, of which the most famous, that of the Countess Cornelia de Baudi Cesenate, was minutely investigated and described by Giuseppe Bianchini, a prebendary of Verona, otherwise distinguished in letters, who published an account of it at Verona in 1731, which he afterwards republished at Rome.
"No man," Poe himself wrote, "has recorded, no man has dared to record, the wonders of his inner life."

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