Recruitment

(redirected from recruiting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

recruitment

[ri′krüt·mənt]
(physiology)
A serial discharge from neurons innervating groups of muscle fibers.

Recruitment

 

(Russian, verbovka; from German werben via Polish werbowac), the hiring of people for military service, one method of troop replacement. In antiquity this method was used chiefly in the form of hiring whole detachments of foreigners in wartime. Another form of recruitment was individual hiring of soldiers, primarily citizens of the country concerned, for a long time or for lifelong military service (the hired standing armies of ancient Rome and Byzantium).

In Western Europe in the Middle Ages, hired troops came to be widely used in the 15th century, and from the end of the 15th century the hired army system became the main system of replacing troops (for instance, during the Thirty Years’ War of 1618-48). Recruitment was rarely voluntary: threats, deception, the use of intoxicants, and direct violence were the usual accompaniments of recruitment. These methods were practiced in Western Europe, especially in Prussia, until the end of the 18th century. Among the great powers only Great Britain and the USA maintained the recruitment system until World War I. In Russia recruitment had not been practiced on a wide scale. At present a considerable part of the personnel of the armed forces serve for hire in various countries such as the USA, West Germany, France, and Great Britain.

References in periodicals archive ?
We're still recruiting from the same demographic (of high school graduates) but the Marines are searching for individuals who want intangibles: honor, courage and commitment,'' said Staff Sgt.
We tell them that we are definitely interested in having them as student-athletes and that they are a priority in the recruiting process.
Let's look at three companies in the local recruiting market who are known for their professionalism and yet also have a unique identity and vision providing the extra "spark" that attracts the best candidates.
This is a result of the job market and ADM increasing its presence through a variety of recruiting channels.
Ninety-one percent of top companies use corporate Web sites for recruiting (iLogos Research 2002).
Findings and results from this test will be incorporated into future marketing events, designed to help the Army become more targeted in its recruiting efforts.
New England Financial, a Boston-based affiliate of MetLife, reports nearly a 33% gain in agents since it launched an aggressive recruiting campaign in 1997.
The hospital's Board of Directors establishes, monitors and reviews internal guidelines for physician recruitment regularly to ensure that recruiting practices are consistent with the hospital's exempt purposes.
Evans says one of the major benefits of having an internal recruiting department is the money savings.
Ten years later, Ames, who by this time had shown little talent at recruiting, was sent to Mexico.
Founded in 1978, Strategy 2000 is a consulting, training and placement firm recruiting executives in science, engineering, marketing, finance and human resources.
A successful recruiting program is critical today because of shrinking accounting graduating classes and firms' greater efforts to raise productivity and cut costs by recruiting only "the best and the brightest.