rectus femoris


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rectus femoris

[′rek·təs ′fem·ə·rəs]
(anatomy)
A division of the quadriceps femoris inserting in the patella and ultimately into the tubercle of the tibia.
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The AIIS is located in the anterior superior portion of the acetabular rim and represents the site of origin of the direct head of the rectus femoris muscle (Hapa et al.).
What can be concluded, however, is that the MMG amplitude and center frequency versus force patterns did not change when the signal from the same location of the skin over the rectus femoris was measured in the PERP and TRAN axes.
The patient was diagnosed with left psoas contracture/ tendinopathy and a plan of management including active and passive stretching of left psoas and rectus femoris, manual facilitation of gluteus maximus, ART[R] of psoas, rectus femoris, obturator externus, sartorius and pectineus was proposed.
An explanation for various rectus femoris strain injuries using previously undescribed muscle architecture.
On the seventh postoperative day, we attached electrodes to the quadriceps muscle again to detect the bioelectric potential along the long axis of the rectus femoris muscle belly (Figure 4(a)).
The ipsilateral rectus femoris was analyzed to evaluate the potential effect of RVC on prime mover activation during isometric knee extension.
Distinct fascicles or groups of fascicles in each compound femoral nerve represented distal nerve branches of the femoral nerve (sartorius, pectineus, medial cutaneous, saphenous, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris).
The patient was diagnosed with myofasciopathy of the right psoas major and rectus femoris. Myofasciopathy can be distinguished from a contusion or muscle strain in that the involved trauma is due to excessive tensile force that overstrains the myofibers and deep fascial layers surrounding the muscles and typically occurs near the myotendinous junction.
Electromyographic activity was assessed in the rectus femoris and the long head of the biceps femoris muscles (Hermens et al., 2000).
We found the rectus femoris and latissimus dorsi to be the best additional channels, increasing the number of feasible postures relative to the model-predicted optimal 8-channel muscle set by 8 percent.
* A "sway back," with excessive external rotation, unsupported core stability, and excessive activity in the quadriceps (especially the rectus femoris, which has a tendency, due to its attachment on the anterior inferior iliac spine, to rotate the pelvis forward into an anterior tilt, which in turn destabilizes the entire spine); and

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