recurrence interval

recurrence interval

[ri′kər·əns ′int·ər·vəl]
(hydrology)
The average time interval between occurrences of a hydrologic event, such as a flood, of a given or greater magnitude.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geologists estimate the recurrence interval of earthquakesas well as theamountof displacements an active fault may generate during earthquakes.
Comparing the mean recurrence interval revealed no significant difference between study groups (P:0.64).
Although other studies have shown that progesterone and GnRHa can reduce the recurrence rate after surgery, Vercellini et al .[16] reported that postoperative use of GnRHa could only prolong the recurrence interval but could not improve the overall recurrence rate.
(2) The sentence "The modeled flood recurrence interval and the return period were also compared with observations" should be changed to "The modeled flood peak flows under different recurrence intervals were also compared with observations."
"What we've seen by looking back at the records is that the energy level conditions we measured during Hurricane Sandy have a two-and-a-half to three-year recurrence interval."
A recurrence interval (RI) is calculated as the reciprocal of the p value and represents the number of days of daily surveillance required for the expected number of clusters at least as unusual as the observed cluster to be equal to 1 by chance (II).
Hydrological modelling and erosion research in this landscape will be improved by the knowledge that clearing of virgin brigalow scrub for cropping or grazed pasture land uses has significantly increased peak runoff rate, particularly for events with an average recurrence interval of less than 2 years for cropping and 4 years for pasture.
After half the average recurrence interval, the chance per year rises to roughly the long-term average.
It might be impossible to predict when the next earthquake may occur but scientists can pin down what is called a recurrence interval or the average time span between earthquake occurrences.
Engineers, geoscientists, geologists, and researchers from the US Geological Survey provide an overview of the earthquake, then discuss seismology and its regional effects, including the magnitude, recurrence interval, and near-source ground-motion modeling of the earthquake; ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization; site response; shear-wave velocity structure and attenuation derived from aftershock data; regional seismic-wave propagation from the earthquake; widespread groundwater-level offsets caused by it; and finite element simulation of an intraplate earthquake setting.
The Phivolcs study roughly estimated that in 200 to 400 years, there will be a possible recurrence interval for large magnitude earthquakes from magnitude 6 to 7 at least along the northern portion of the Marikina Valley Fault.
where RP and RQ represent the normalized residual of the design precipitation and the corresponding design flow at the virtual watershed, respectively, DP and DQ represent the estimated design precipitation and design flow, respectively, and superscript and subscript attached to the letter DP and DQ represent recurrence interval and the type of time series on which the calculation is based (either the MBLRPM, THM, or observed), respectively.