recusant

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recusant

1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that The Woman Hater comments on the Plot has been noted for over a century: in his 1914 study of Beaumont, Charles Mills Gayley drew attention to the Vaux connection and commented that the dramatist 'alludes with horror to the Plot itself, but holds up for ridicule the informers who swarmed the streets of London in the years succeeding, and trumped up charges of conspiracy and recusancy against unoffending persons'.
Modern scholars such as Hugh Aveling have speculated that the play was specially written for the troupe by clerics associated with the nearby Grosmont Priory, Whitby, a well-known centre of recusancy (290).
Arguing that the reconstruction effort "can only really be judged in the context of that decade" (152), McCafferty defends the logic behind that effort while showing that, though Bramhall, Wentworth, and Laud were effective in carrying it out, they alienated powerful lay and clerical interests with their overdependence on prerogative, their strategy of putting off the problem of recusancy while reconstruction proceeded, and their inability to see many of the difficulties in "Anglicizing" the Irish Church.
2 of 1593, which prescribed banishment from the realm-for those who failed to conform for However, the continuing prevalence of a more general laxity, over and above ideological recusancy, was exemple lifted in the series of bills on non-churchgoing which came before the 1601 Parliament, two of which were only narrowly defeated.
The continuing practice of recusancy, compelling Catholics to attend Protestant services or pay a steep fine, brought about great financial hardship as "farmers and laborers who decidedly preferred the old forms of worship, were deprived of their rites and ministers, and ruined by spies, pursuivants and bad neighbours, who carded off their goods under cover of collecting recusancy fines, till one by one they gave up the struggle and conformed."
King Charles I's 1624 marriage to the Catholic Henrietta Maria, whose marriage contract stipulated both the suspension of recusancy laws in England and the maintenance of a Catholic chapel at Court, brought the threat of a return to Catholicism too close for many.
The currently fashionable speculation on Shakespeare's early life sees him as connected with Lancastrian Catholic families, among whom he served a political and dramatic apprenticeship in the shadowy world of English recusancy. McCarthy's alternative sees the (very) young Shakespeare as a key player within the Protestant Dudley/Sidney ambitions to take center stage in Elizabethan politics, which could have even ended in a coup.
Although her story embraces the second session of the reign's first Parliament, there is no mention of matters to which Gardiner devoted many pages--wardship, trade, monopolies, purveyance, or the "Apology." One of the prickliest encounters of these years, the discussion of Union between England and Scotland, receives only cursory mention (in comparison with the extensive treatment of Puritanism and recusancy).
She then turns to Satire 4 and its anxiety about recusancy to argue, "Donne's handling of the potentially treasonous material of his poem is neatly equivalent to his handling of the equally dangerous pose of his portrait.
Christopher Hollis (whose prose benefits from his having been a friend of Evelyn Waugh) describes with harsh accuracy Dryden's situation after James's exile in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and the return of the Protestant monarchy under William and Mary: [T]here was a real risk in obstinate persistence in recusancy. Oates was still alive; the Plot was only seven years [past] ...
The attack on Cecil may also be seen as a criticism of the policies that he pursued, such as the ruthless recusancy laws established at the Hampton Court Conference in 1604 or the negotiations that brought peace with Spain that same year.
Second, Ackroyd interprets John Shakespeare's sudden absence from the Stratford Council, where he had been a regular and leading member up to 1577, to his recusancy, that is, his determination to absent himself from required church attendance out of conviction that the reformed liturgy was heretical (67-68).