red giant star


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red giant star

[′red ¦ji·ənt ′stär]
(astronomy)
A star whose evolution has progressed to the point where hydrogen core burning has been completed, the helium core has become denser and hotter than originally, and the envelope has expanded to perhaps 100 times its initial size.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The phenomenon was observed by the ESA's (European Space Agency) Integral space observatory, which saw a red giant star revive its dead companion star with a flash of X-rays.
NGC 2343 has a distinctive shape like a miniature Hyades cluster, with the part of Aldebaran played by the red giant star HD 54387.
In 2010, the satellite observed a white dwarf orbiting a red giant star, which blows gas into space.
"Once the tidal disruption flare dims below some threshold luminosity that can be seen in observations, the window closes for that particular galaxy." In a recent paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, Bogdanovic, working with Roseanne Cheng (Center for Relativistic Astrophysics at Georgia Tech) and Pau Amaro-Seoane (Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam, Germany), considered the tidal disruption of a red giant star by a supermassive black hole using computer modeling.
Three planets were discovered, two orbiting stars similar to the Sun and one orbiting a more massive and evolved red giant star.
Even if humanity were to somehow survive for millions of years (overcoming climate change, natural disasters, wars, extinction of other species and whatever else the future may throw at us), it would still be hard-pressed roughly five billion years from now, when the sun moves into the next phase of its life-cycle, turning into a red giant star that will engulf Earth.
Three planets were discovered, two orbiting stars similar to the Sun and one orbiting a more massive and evolved red giant star. The first two planets both have about one third the mass of Jupiter and orbit their host stars in seven and five days respectively.
Kawaler contributed as part of the research team that studied regular changes in the brightness of the host star, Kepler-56, an aging red giant star with two planets in close orbits and a massive third planet in a distant orbit.
A star with a mass similar to the sun (about half to eight solar masses), when it runs out of fuel (hydrogen, which undergoes nuclear fusion to become helium), will first turn into a red giant star and start burning helium, and then, will shrink to become a white dwarf.
As much as 90 percent of the red giant star's mass can be stripped off in a stellar collision, but the details of this process are not well understood.
The companion to the black hole in M83 is likely a red giant star at least 500 million years old, with a mass less than four times the sun's.
Earth will face a similar challenge in about 5 billion years, when our sun swells to become a red giant star. As its outer envelope puffs up, the sun will swallow Mercury and Venus, but Earth's fate is uncertain, theorists say.