red gum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.

red gum

[′red ¦gəm]
(pharmacology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gum

1. A moderately high-density hardwood of the eastern and southern US; whitish to gray-green in color and of uniform texture; used for low-grade veneer, plywood, and rough cabinet work.
2. Any of a class of colloidal substances that are soluble or swell in water, exuded by or prepared from plants; sticky when moist.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
La Trobe Wildlife Tree canopy damage (River Red Gum, both Sanctuary large trees saved by possum bands), severely Bundoora grazed ground layer, endangered natural 30 ha Matted Flax-lily suppressed and unable to La Trobe University fower (author, pers.
First record from Greece of the invasive red gum lerp psyllid Glycaspis brimblecombei Moore (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and its associated parasitoid Psyllaephagus bliteus Riek (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae).
Extensive areas of Eucalyptus largiflorens (black box) woodland and a paucity of Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river red gum) are characteristic of this unit.
Eleven interviews were conducted at Red Gum Communities, reflective of its smaller size and flatter organisational structure.
According to Carroll and others, another up and coming mid-toned wood is figured red gum. "We are seeing it used for furniture and also residential installation work," Carroll says.
Materials: Patches of red gum timber decking add a natural touch to the beige pavers that cover part of the deck, veneer the waterfall and serve as coping.
The tree is known by a variety of names--gum ball tree, red gum, star-leafed gum, alligator wood, and gum tree--most pertaining to the prickly balls it produces.
Some are ubiquitous, like the River Red Gum, which grows in every mainland state, while others are seldom seen, like the Wollemi Pine, restricted to a few remote gorges deep in the Blue Mountains.
Around 225 km north of Melbourne, on the Murray River flood plain between Echuca and Tocumwal, lies one of Australia's ecological jewels--Barmah Forest, part of the world's largest river red gum forest.
Department of Agriculture Forest Products Laboratory Wood Handbook, "The lumber from sweetgum is usually divided into two classes--sap gum, the tight-colored wood from the sapwood, and red gum, the reddish brown heartwood." At one time, the commercial name for sapwood was hazel pine white heartwood was sometimes called satin walnut.