pulp

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Related to red pulp: splenic pulp, splenic sinus

pulp:

see paperpaper,
thin, flat sheet or tissue made usually from plant fiber but also from rags and other fibrous materials. It is used principally for printing and writing on but has many other applications. The term also includes various types of paperboard, such as cardboard and wallboard.
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Pulp

 

a mixture of a finely ground (smaller than 1–0.5 mm) useful mineral and water. It is formed during such processes as the grinding of useful minerals before concentration, hydraulic mining, and hydraulic transport.

The density of pulp (the weight ratio between solid and liquid phases) and the number of particle-size fractions present determine the viscosity, which increases with an increase in density and in the number of particle-size fractions (in micron dimensions). The two factors also determine the sedimentation rate, which decreases with an increase in pulp density and with an increase in the fine particles present.


Pulp

 

the principal mass of the spleen. A distinction is made between red pulp, which consists of reticular tissue whose loops contain mostly red blood cells, and white pulp, which consists of reticular tissue with lymphoid cells.

pulp

[pəlp]
(anatomy)
A mass of soft spongy tissue in the interior of an organ.
(botany)
The soft succulent portion of a fruit.
(engineering)
(materials)
The cellulosic material produced by reducing wood mechanically or chemically and used in making paper and cellulose products. Also known as wood pulp.

pulp

1. soft or fleshy plant tissue, such as the succulent part of a fleshy fruit
2. Dentistry the soft innermost part of a tooth, containing nerves and blood vessels
References in periodicals archive ?
Disorders predominantly affecting the red pulp include infections (e.
Splenic diffuse red pulp small B cell lymphoma: toward the emergence of a new lymphoma entity.
Statistical analysis of the histopathological changes of the splenic tissues revealed that diabetes significantly induced depletion in the white pulp, a dilation in the blood vessels, an increase of the collagen deposition and a depletion in the iron particles detected in the red pulp.
Martel et al (1) and other researchers (2-5) found 3 distinct types of blood vessels in the specimens they examined, mirroring the normal composition of splenic red pulp.
Red pulp was prominent, with increased histiocytes, platelets and debris (Figure 3B).
Non treated spleen sections showed normal spleen structure composed of white pulp and red pulp besides fibrous capsule which covered the spleen.
Some consider hamartomas congenital malformation of the splenic red pulp, a neoplasm, excessive and disorganized growth of abnormally formed red pulp, or a reactive lesion to prior trauma.
The white pulp was separated from the red pulp by the marginal sinus embedded in a layer of marginal zone lymphocytes.
Red pulp infiltration is also present and may be prominent.
It is characterized by the exclusive presence of red pulp tissue without associated white pulp, although there may be scattered lymphoid cells.