red tide

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red tide:

see Dinoflagellatadinoflagellata
, phylum (division) of unicellular, mostly marine algae, called dinoflagellates. In some classification systems this division is called Pyrrhophyta. There are approximately 2,000 species of dinoflagellates.
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red tide

[′red ′tīd]
(biology)
A reddish discoloration of coastal surface waters due to concentrations of certain toxin-producing dinoflagellates. Also known as red water.
References in periodicals archive ?
With Florida red tide lingering on the Gulf of Mexico coast for nearly 16 months, Dr, Cynthia Heil arrived at Mote Marine Laboratory in January 2019 and hit the ground running.
Moreover, the BFAR's Shellfish Bulletin 1, released by the Information and Fisherfolk Coordination Unit has added Cancabato Bay, Tacloban City in Leyte among areas that are positive for red tide toxin.
Red tide is a common name for a phenomenon known as algal bloom, in which large quantities of algae accumulate rapidly in sea water and result in discolouration of the surface water.
There have been some studies on the red tide prediction.
The red tide killed at least 305 manatees over the next year.
Red tide organisms cause problems for fish because they emit chemicals called brevetoxins which interfere with the functioning of gills.
Dr Al Ghais said the red tides are mostly caused by natural occurrences due to the rapid growth of phytoplankton and that there were limited scientific solutions to the phenomenon.
Images were taken to show the biological activity off the country's coastline in the Arabian Gulf, which indicates the potential occurrence of the red tide.
During the red tide event, NCHD issued several beach advisories, beginning September 25, alerting the public to the health risks of exposure to brevetoxins, especially for persons with preexisting respiratory conditions.
Are changes in global climate adding to the problem of Florida red tides? Scientists are studying whether changing ocean temperatures, currents, and weather patterns associated with climate change may be affecting Florida red tides.
One theory holds that red tides are fueled by phosphorus- and nitrogen-bearing plant nutrients brought to the region by local rivers or carried there from the Mississippi River by ocean currents.
Occasionally red tides have left behind them the heartbreaking sight of large numbers of dolphins and other marine animals lying dead on beaches.