redeposition


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redeposition

[rē‚dep·ə′zish·ən]
(geology)
Formation into a new accumulation, such as the deposition of sedimentary material that has been picked up and moved (reworked) from the place of its original deposition, or the solution and reprecipitation of mineral matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, a primary redeposition describes a burial that is not in a fully articulated state but contains elements found in quantities comparable to those in the primary burials.
It is hypothesized that a redeposition mechanism after atoms are sputtered away is partly responsible for the observed behavior, while the rest is due to interdiffusion between the SDC and YSZ layers.
The latter was subject to the redeposition of sediments from the harvested plot after harvesting was completed and the tide came in.
The events of resuspension and redeposition of the sediment surface that can be caused by rain alter nutritional composition (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus), which in turn can influence microbial communities.
Setting order numbers and repetition numbers appropriately allows for serial or parallel processing of objects in a group, or even a combination thereof for optimizing both redeposition and resolution.
The form of these deposits seem to suggest the repeated working (or redeposition) of worked mine spoil within a series of steeply inclined opencasts dug on surface weathered portions of quartz stockwork veins associated with the Carreg y ddol and North Discovery Lodes.
In addition to this, samples irradiated with more than 5 pulses presented a yellowish and slightly hazy appearance, which results from marked redeposition of molten material and polymer degradation during the multipulse ablation process.
This corresponds to the phase of strong sedimentation, with the transportation of materials from various parts of the site, situated on higher levels, preceding their redeposition, with the consequent mixing of materials from various periods, both the early and Full Chalcolithic.
During pipeline cleaning it is necessary to emulsify hydrocarbon and solid particles removed in order to prevent redeposition downstream.
This view is consistent with observations of lungfish dental anatomy, including Tomes (1882), Peyer (1925), Bemis (1984), and Smith & Krupina (2001), all of whom noted the sustained growth and redeposition of dental plates in Dipnoi.
This sediment is, in effect, a transgressive lag deposit produced by the mixing of post-Wisconsinan sediment introduced by Holocene and modern rivers draining the adjacent land areas, and the exhumation, mobilization, and redeposition of Pleistocene and older continental-shelf sediment resulting from Holocene sea-level rise and storm activity.