reduplicate

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reduplicate

(of petals or sepals) having the margins curving outwards
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Reduplications like this last three which are for emphasis can be reduplicated as many as the stresses are intended.
7): Showed duplication of GSV in left leg of a female cadaver which began in the ankle region, the two veins united below knee to form one vein which reduplicated at knee level.
As already mentioned, the middle participle iyana- can in principle go back to either *iyana(root present) or to *yiyana- (reduplicated present).
Most tumors have been sampled before resection by fine-needle aspiration, in which the basaloid proliferation associated with the reduplicated basement membrane and glycosaminoglycan material is usually diagnostic (figure 1, B).
He provides evidence based on the behavior of similar reduplicated plurals in other Semitic languages.
Ultrastructural features include small cell bodies and elongated, interdigitating cytoplasmic processes invested by a complete external lamina which is often reduplicated. These processes are commonly connected by desmosome-like junctions.
The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University collated and reduplicated data and helped prepare the list submitted to the Department of Defense (DOD).
Their model is capable of being reduplicated for other Iranian cities [13].
On the other hand, bien in PRSp cannot be reduplicated, since it is already an expression of extreme degree:
Reduplicated as a mirror image of itself, Clessidra resembles the device it is named for, one that, more than any other, is a metaphor for the ineluctability of time.
The volatility and deceptiveness of the speculative economy is reduplicated in the novel's view of the transformation of social relations into depthless, insincere, and volatile affairs.
The major aim of this study is to show that the use of reduplicated consonant graphemes as indicators of vowel shortness is not confined exclusively to The Ormulum because this practice derives directly from Old English scribal tradition, where <CC> sequences were used not only to represent geminate (or long) consonants, but sporadically also for marking short vowels.