reef patch

reef patch

[′rēf ‚pach]
(geology)
A single large colony of coral formed independently on a shelf at depths less than 220 feet (70 meters) in the lagoon of a barrier reef or of an atoll. Also known as patch reef.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 2005 study in the Bahamas by Oregon State University concluded that a single lionfish can reduce native fish populations on a coral reef patch by nearly 80 percent in just five weeks.
Known as Snapper Ledge, the small reef patch is about five miles off Tavernier in federal N, waters of the Atlantic.
Then again, this time of year reef patches are infested with large mangrove snappers along with Marquesas lanes-what we call large lane snappers.
(2000) suggest that the habitat value of an individual oyster reef is amplified when these habitats occur in networks of reef patches and are interspersed with other favorable habitats such as sea grass beds.
Fish species diversity on model and natural reef patches: experimental insular biogeography.
Due to its phenotypic plasticity, high reproductive fitness and competition abilities, the first species is widely distributed and can be easily found in reef patches and forming both, fringing and barrier reefs, covering a wide range of depths (Foster 1979, Weil and Knowlton 1994, Van Veguel et al.
Yet they do, and once inside the lagoon they swim in search of reef patches on which to settle.
Conflicting results between monitoring and manipulation of reef patches of different sizes have resulted in much debate about the degree to which fish communities are organized.
There are thousands of inshore reef patches throughout the Florida Keys, areas are in 10 to 40 feet of water that can easily be found on a chart or chart plotter.
In the nearshore waters throughout the Keys you can expect a great bite in the reef patches and wrecks.
Yes you read it right, the inshore fishing in the Keys, especially in the shallow reef patches along Hawks Channel and Florida Bay area will be inhabited by a plethora of fish, including snappers, groupers, jacks, porgies, mackerels and many others.
These shallow reef patches are teeming with life that can produce a mix bag of edible fish.