reference block

reference block

[′ref·rəns ‚bläk]
(computer science)
A block within a computer program governing a numerically controlled machine which has enough data to allow resumption of the program following an interruption.
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where R and S denote the reference block and the similar block, respectively, w is the weight of the corresponding block, [??](x) is the local block-wise estimate, and [chi](x) is a characteristic function.
To reduce the time cost, we propose a virtual reference block (VRB) approach in which the DFDP is equally partitioned into some blocks called VRBs represented by red dash rectangles in Fig.
And then the block-matching in the VBM3D occasionally searches out of the region that contains the reference block, which will result in poor matching in the areas that heavily contaminated by noise and this would lead to blurred edges [9].
The displacement between the center of the search area and the best match reference block is represented by the Actual Motion Vector (AMY) [5].
Based on the location and size of the pattern in a source image estimated from a previous algorithm, a source image block I is created as a reference block. Some image blocks are selected from a target image to compare with reference block I.
The probe is held vertically and a zero reference block is placed over the end of the gun, as illustrated below.
A number of Sana'a University students announced they will soon launch the 17 September Movement as a reference block for the students at the university.
In reality, notification of any defect and interpretation of the signal breaks in the case of electronic systems (linear, nonlinear or digital) which process external signals, can be done simply and effectively done by using the principle of comparison, which means constantly comparing the output signal of the basic block [S.sub.B] (t) with the signal of a control block or reference block [S.sub.M] (t), which in principle is the same as the basic block.
A 3.2-mm- (0.125-in-) diameter flat-bottomed hole (FBH) that is 12.7 mm (0.5 in) deep was present in the center of one end of the reference block. This reference block was chosen since it provides a pulse path from transducer to defect that is similar to that used in hanger pin specimens.
The cost of mining at the reference block effectively relates costs per tonne for any given block (in this case, external waste), to the base costs at a particular reference block location (120 m elevation).
When the decision component chooses prediction, its output includes an error block, denoting the difference of the block to be coded and the reference block. If the decision component would use the original reference frame(s), errors might accumulate.

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