reference point


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reference point

[′ref·rəns ‚pȯint]
(navigation)
A point to which other points, lines, and so forth are referred, usually in terms of distance or direction, or both.

Reference Point

 

a celestial body used in space navigation for orientation or for the solution of problems. The sun, planets, and bright stars can all serve as reference points. A convenient reference point is the bright southern star Canopus, which is situated relatively close to the perpendicular to the plane of the ecliptic. For interplanetary voyages, which generally take place within this plane, the angle between the lines connecting a spacecraft with the sun and with Canopus varies within narrow limits, thus simplifying navigation. Technical difficulties are encountered in the use of faint stars as reference points.

reference point

i. A fixed datum near the center of an airfield landing area.
ii. Any point or place on the ground used for reference in navigating, locating, or aiming at a target.
iii. A point on the aerial photograph used for reference to fit it with other aerial photographs in making up a map or a mosaic.
References in periodicals archive ?
By smoothing the transformed values over time, a better overall consistency could be achieved, although the initial selection of reference points might prove problematic, particularly since skipping the quantization step would be very costly in terms of computational effort, especially considering that video formats are often high-resolution.
Additionally, we performed analyses in a model with reference point adaptation.
Finally, a niche-preservation strategy is employed to select individuals from lth level that are associated with each reference point. [[alpha].sub.h] represents the number of population members from [P.sub.t+1] = [S.sub.t]/[L.sub.l] connected to the hth reference point.
The positioning distance ([D.sub.j]) between the stored RSSI value ([RSSI.sub.offline]) and the online collected RSSI value ([RSSI.sub.online]) at jth reference point is given by
Noise in reference measuring point in 1 m distance from the street is bigger in whole spectrum than in reference point 10 m away from the same street section.
In part, this is due to the lack of standards or guidelines requiring the use of a manikin-based reference point. MILSTD-1472G, which specifies human engineering requirements for military systems, bases dimension requirements for seats and vehicle driver workstations on a SRP similar to the reference point replaced by H-point in the 1960s.
In the base scenario (SI), [F.sub.current] was lower than both limit reference points (i.e., [F.sub.max] and [F.sub.SSB25]) and the target reference point [F.sub.0.1], but it was higher than [F.sub.SSB40] (Table 2).
[M.sub.split] estimators [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] computed for unstable reference datum, have a similar values as the least squares estimators [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] determined in the variant, in which assumed that the instability of reference point PP03 was detected.
Note that, the mobile entity may not locate on a reference point. In comparison, as each position will be logically appointed to a reference point in the field, we use the appointed reference point to denote the real position.
(2012a) the grey extensions of both approaches of the MOORA method, Ratio system and Reference point approaches, were discussed in details.
Ford Asia Pacific Vehicle Line Director (Small Cars) Graham Pearson, said, 'We are already working on projects to develop vehicles with India as a reference point market, and to take them to other similar markets.'