referred pain


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referred pain

[ri′fird ′pān]
(medicine)
Pain felt in one area but originating in another area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Referral to a GI or GU specialist may be warranted for cases of referred pain to the groin.
The referred pain of a trigger point can be described as "dull and aching, often deep, with intensity varying from low-grade discomfort to severe and incapacitating torture.
In particular, the first chapter focuses on the neurophysiology of myofascial pain, referred pain and TrPs, and the pathophysiology ofTrPs.
They present about 200 photos of key anatomical landmarks by region, with labeled overlays and brief descriptions, and include reference to movements, cutaneous innervation, referred pain, surgical/anesthetic access, and clinical conditions.
The subjects were not allowed to mention whether they felt any pain in the area being palpated at the time of palpation, but they were later asked if pain and referred pain were felt when certain areas were palpated.
Other likely causes include soft-tissue periarticular problems, referred pain, pain sensitisation, or neuropathic painBecause of the risk of infection, and the possible need for further surgery, orthopaedic surgeons are generally keen to investigate these patients thoroughly and exclude surgical causes of the problem.
The end result is joint wear and tear, disc degeneration, an increased likelihood of muscle spasms, and experiencing referred pain syndromes or sciatica.
The 2009 Canadian national champion and World Championship qualifier missed last year's outdoor season with a sacroilliac joint dysfunction, which caused referred pain in her lower back.
In the literature, there are a number of studies that showed the pain, originating from the SIJ and other sources may produce referred pain in the buttock, groin and lower extremities (7-9).
It includes hip osteoarthritis, trochanteric bursitis, iliopsoas bursitis, stenosis of the cervical spinal canal, pelvic or sacral insufficiency fracture, muscle strain or tears, vascular claudication, myofascial referred pain, and facet arthropathy without stenosism, said Dr.
The differential diagnosis for LSS includes hip osteoarthritis, trochanteric bursitis, iliopsoas bursitis, stenosis of the cervical spinal canal, pelvic or sacral insufficiency fracture, muscle strain or tears, vascular claudication, myofascial referred pain, and facet arthropathy without stenosis.
Myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) is a painful condition in which distinct trigger point areas, generally within muscles or fasciae, become abnormally active and produce local and referred pain.