refer

(redirected from referring)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms.

refer

[ri′fər]
(ordnance)
To bring the gunsights on a chosen aiming point without moving an artillery piece which has been laid for direction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Merge eMed's Referring Practice Portal gives instant, secure access to radiology reports, images, patient data, and scheduling information from any internet-connected computer.
* Coordinate the patient's care within the institution, rather than putting the burden on the patient or referring provider
The most important factor in this good referral etiquette among doctors, however, is that the specialist sends the patient back to the primary doctor once the referring problem has been managed.
A total of 167 patients (54%) returned to their referring obstetricians, but patients who had been trying to conceive for 1 year or less were far more likely to make this decision than were patients who had been trying for more than 1 year.
And still others (although in the minority) maintain Caesar was referring to the process of diecasting.
In these cases, the referring CPA must meet the same requirements as other applicants and pass the series 65 licensing exam.
Boyle noted a second confidentiality issue involving access to corporate tax returns granted to non-government employees under the Intergovernmental Personnel Act's Mobility Program, referring to a recent paper on the effect of an acquirer's domicile on the post-acquisition taxable income of its target.
Apoptotic (apoptosis): referring to genetically "programmed" cell death, a natural process in which DNA-damaged or otherwise unwanted cells are eliminated.
(55) German and French sources have "Die jungen engel werden alt teuffel" and "De jeune angelot, vieux diable." (56) In sum, the possibility that Erasmus is referring to vernacular variants cannot be ruled out.
"How do you show that [Winchell's murder] was a hate crime if his girlfriend is referring to herself as a she?
This was Lee's second employee referral for the company; he had also earned $2,000 for referring a colleague under Tellabs' previous referral program.
Benjamin Brawley, in The Negro Genius (1937), evades the issue of the New Negro or a New Negro Renaissance by referring to Harlem Renaissance writers as the "New Realists" and as writers of "Protest and Vindication." Brawley further establishes a precedent for, indicates the lack of novelty in, and, perhaps, shows the attitude of the New Negro by pointing out that Lucien B.